Kathleen Turner

The Oscar nominee told Andy Cohen she was supposed to co-star with someone else.
Except maybe Missy Elliott's funky white sister.
The actress told Vulture about Trump's "gross" handshake, her distaste for Elizabeth Taylor, and much more.
Encouraged to proceed the fight against rheumatoid arthritis, Kathleen began doing gymnastics every day. She started slowly
Today marks "Equal Pay Day," the day when women's pay finally catches up to men's pay from last year. You'll have to forgive me for not cheering too loudly. Each year Equal Pay Day highlights how far we still have to go in the fight for pay equity, and it's striking how little headway has been made on closing the gap in recent years, with progress all but stagnating in the past decade. Across the board, women continue to be paid less than their male counterparts -- a fact that takes on new significance in an election year where the views of the Republican presidential candidates on the gender pay gap range from dismissive to downright hostile.
There was no mistaking the deep, husky voice when I answered the phone. Actress Kathleen Turner was most definitely on the line. Naturally, the conversation turned to another husky voiced screen legend, Lauren Bacall.
Moving can be traumatic. But last week, when the cast of a hit Broadway show had to relocate to its new home at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, literally next door, the mood was more merry than miserable.
Photos by kevinberne.com Seven years after her death, the fiercely outspoken journalist has rematerialized in Berkeley Rep's
Greg Archer: I'm curious about who some of your inspirations--in the past, or now? Kathleen Turner: Well any one-person show
I am astonished at the staying power of The War of the Roses, which takes a rather dark view on the end of a marriage, and what the process itself does to people. People I meet are convinced that the story is autobiographical.