kauffman-foundation

Poised. Articulate. Innovative. Confident. As the graduation season continues, it's not uncommon to hear commencement speakers lauding such praise on graduating high school seniors. But, recipient of seed funding? Serial entrepreneur? Patent-holder? Not so much.
The first major difference between having an idea and a startup is how others react to you. You need customer feedback to understand if your product or service provides value in people's lives and what they like or don't like about your company.
For entrepreneurs considering where to start a company or how to engage the assistance of others, there is some value to "the Village," but in an emerging way that may be redefining what we expect from the communities in which we engage.
Four hundred plus individuals came together to hear stories of innovation from nearly 20 leading speakers, and to build lasting relationships within the regional and national community to move entrepreneurship forward.
Entrepreneurship is a growing global craze, no doubt about it. Case in point: More than 2,000 people from 130 countries met in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, last week to share stories about the obstacles and opportunities of building startup communities in cities across the globe.
The program launched in April 2012 with about a dozen people and attracted modest attendance the first couple of months. But by the end summer, attendance reached the 100-level and has since doubled to 200. As of February, the 260 mark has been breached.
I emailed and texted a wide array of "South by" regulars, each of whom imparted some very valuable wisdom. Their advice was so good that I felt like I had to write this article and share it with anyone else interested in making the most out of their SXSW experience.
An entrepreneurial project requires you to live with it -- with uncertainty, naysayers, and the fog of creation -- for so long that you can only do it if it's so personal you would be irritated about it anyway.
While lifespans have increased by a full three decades, our culture has not necessarily kept pace in addressing what this increased longevity means for our activities, professions and opportunities.
Kansas City is pushing the envelope in becoming one of the strongest, if not the finest entrepreneurial city in this great country through a renewed spirit of collaboration, community and leadership.
To serve as many clients as possible at an affordable price point, companies strive to find the right balance of product features to appeal to the masses. Not surprisingly, they usually find that one size does not fit all.
While the year started with some hopeful employment numbers, job creation is trending in the wrong direction.
Above all, great entrepreneurs are optimistic. Their passion, their belief, their can-do attitude all lead to a positive vision for the future. In fact, you might wonder, what is better than an optimistic entrepreneur? The answer: Many optimistic entrepreneurs!