kay redfield jamison

Deaf gain, rather than hearing loss, has long been theorized in capital-D-Deaf cultural spaces. Borrowing liberally from this "reframing," I wish to forward a perspective that I call "mad advantage."
Over the past decade or so, the climate has improved for people with mental illness, and that is true whether or not a person has a beautiful mind.
TOUCHED WITH FIRE is a new film that explores the complexities of living with bipolar disorder.
While I have been heartened by the overwhelming compassion that people have shown for the late Robin Williams and his family, I have been a bit concerned by comments such as "I hope he is at peace now."
The romantic notion that mental illness and creativity are linked is so prominent in the public consciousness that it is rarely challenged. So before I continue, let me nip this in the bud: Mental illness is neither necessary nor sufficient for creativity.
There is no link between creativity and mental illness. Creative people are not more likely to be diagnosed with mental illness, and mentally ill people are not more likely to be creative than normal people.