keeping up with the joneses

NEW YORK - Jon Hamm stopped by BUILD Series this morning to discuss his new movie Keeping Up With The Joneses with Ricky
The stories of our lives -- as told through status updates and pins and photographs -- are incomplete. Yet it is all too easy to forget that what we see are simply snapshots, moments in time, titles to the chapters of people's lives.
Trying to keep up with the Joneses could spell economic disaster.
Tip of the week: Know what you can afford and don't be afraid to say no. You can always say yes later when your financial planning pays off with some big dividends.
Keeping up with Joneses has been part of our society for some time, but with social networking on the rise with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc., the number of "Joneses" we have to compare ourselves to has expanded profusely.
I've had my fair share of mistakes when it comes to personal finance. Last week I wrote a post about how online poker changed how I view money. I was spending money like there was no tomorrow, splurging on unnecessary items, and didn't save a single penny of winnings.
For years, Elmo was a furry guy who existed only on T-shirts. When you finally saw him walk and talk, you practically sh*t yourself.
Between the fundraisers, the soccer and T-ball games, the family celebrations and topping it off with Girl's Night Out, when do these people have time to sleep? And it's not just weekends. The madness happens on weeknights too.
True luxury is about authenticity, and you cannot create authenticity simply by buying more. Nor can you create it by buying the most expensive items or by trying to keep up with the latest and greatest that someone else told you was a "must have" for the season.
"The More You Know" historically has been the topic of both parody and praise. More prestigious segments have featured President
In America today, it seems like we are always striving for something. To be bigger, better than who we are. We're never content with what we have. But why? Where did this sense of not being enough come from?
Have you heard? The Joneses filed for bankruptcy. It seems, like everyone else who tried to keep up with them, they were living above their means. All of that "stuff" they acquired turned them into a textbook case of a broke American family -- chapter eleven of that book, to be exact.
We are recently informed that a typical middle-income family can expect to spend more than $225,000 to raise a child - born
We never really met anyone that we could honestly say was completely selfless until this past summer when we were given the privilege of meeting 10 young girls from Haiti.
The passing of Michael Jackson and Farrah Fawcett has hit us near-baby boomers and full-on baby boomers with a rock and roll punch to the gut we weren't ready for.
Illegal immigrants' work ethic becomes a source of national pride. No one works so hard for so little money with such inadequate health care.
In Confessions of a Shopaholic, the film I adapted, the character's shopping obsession starts as a child when she watches the Joneses get sparkly shoes while her Cleaverish parents buy her sturdy brown clunkers.