kennedy assassination

It's still only August, but already the predictions that this would be an exceedingly banal presidential election campaign look like they've already come true. This week's campaign news might be summed up as an elementary school playground shouting match: "You're a bigot!" "No, you're a bigot!" Sigh.
If one reads carefully The Devil's Chessboard along with James Douglass's superb book, JFK and the Unspeakable, the reader will come away with a deeper understanding of the "crime of the century" that synthesizes the most relevant details that 50 years of scholarship and investigation have provided.
I have been a life-long magician, both as a performer and creator of magical effects. This art of manipulation, misdirection, and deception has taught me a sobering life lesson -- be careful what you choose to believe.
Tabloid headlines, internet comment threads, that one uncle at Thanksgiving dinner: Conspiracy theories are everywhere. Polls reveal the truth -- the truth about what the public believes, that is. While some conspiracy theories are dismissed by the vast majority of the public, others are widely accepted as true.
The Cold War against Cuba not only made life worse for ordinary Cubans. It also diminished America's own democracy and undermined its lofty spoken commitments to human rights and the rule of law.
Belsky's novel is a fascinating character study of disgraced journalist Gil Malloy, on the hunt for a serial killer who may very well be in possession of a long-buried secret that could reveal the rotted, corrupt truth behind the Kennedy assassination.
The recent bungling by our country's Secret Service of its mission to protect our president stirs up haunting memories for those of us still emotionally wounded by the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963.
A pairing of photographs of emotionally captivated women charts a course of events 50 years ago which can tell us something, today, about the power of the arts and the humanities to affect the quality of human life, and more, to ensure the survival of its spirit.
Just as November 22, 1963 was a wakeup call regarding presidential succession and inability, 9/11 should have been regarding remaining governmental continuity gaps.
It's a complex and fascinating set of situations, one which would undoubtedly engage Kennedy greatly. It's too bad he's not around to counsel Obama.
One man in particular feels that what has been missing to this point has been a rendering of a major book in graphic novel. That person is Seth Reuben Jacobson, co-author along with the illustrator, Oliver Hine.
I have devoted the past thirty-six years to public service; having served two Presidents, two United States Senators, two
“How, then, do we pray today? For what do we pray? We pray to a God who is still at work in his world. We pray with a faith
The wall-to-wall media coverage of the past few days has jarred my memory in interesting ways. I have no recollection of President Kennedy's assassination itself. I was only two and half years old. But the event is seared into my brain.
Ruby shoots Oswald -- but what was that third guy doing? I had always wondered. Then I got the chance to ask him.
Since that day in New York City, I really haven't cared about who killed President Kennedy. Instead, I tend to think about what the Kennedy administration might've achieved had it been able to fully pursue its agenda.
As a young girl living through it, I never thought the day, marking 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, would ever come. So much was sealed, so much kept from the public at the time with a promise that way into the future, all would be made known.
Kennedy's call to action, from his first to his last day as president, was a constant call to citizenship - local, national, and global. It was a call to embrace the promise of American reinvention and renewal.
I was 5-years-old on Friday, November 22, 1963, the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Even we kids could perceive the paradigm shift that took place as a result of that horrendous event and recall the somber and mournful tone of the next few days.