kerry james marshall

When the man who curated a Carl Andre show fires a woman who curated a Kerry James Marshall show, it's not a good look.
His staggering paintings use the language of Western art history to paint the black experience.
"Ultimately, I want to change the way people view art, the way people buy art, the way they make art."
"Where am I in this story?" Watch artists such as Wangechi Mutu, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o and Chimamanda Adichie discuss how black people are (mis-)represented in today's society and culture.
This spring, Africa arrives in New York. The city will be treated to an unprecedented opportunity to observe and experience
The Season 3 trailer for The Artist Project is below. The new season, in which I am included, will be released this week on September 16th.
From the historical to the contemporary, from city centers to the far-flung reaches of the Arctic Circle, there is an abundance of events and exhibitions drawing art lovers to the northernmost reaches of Europe.
When I look at works of art I am more interested than ever in a single question: "What do I have in common with the artist who made this?"
Imagine being seen for who you really are, inhabiting space as a central figure in the narration. In this powerful interview American artist Kerry James Marshall talks about how he explores the presence and absence of the black figure in art history.
One of Marshall's most startling works depicts Nat Turner with the severed head of his master lying on a pillow. Turning