2020 Election
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Kevyn Orr

Orr and Blow’s fears aren’t unique, but are high-profile reminders of the fear black men and their families have about police
Orr gets it. He went after pension debt, the city's biggest foe, and is now winning that fight. Simply put, his continued focus on pension reform is the solution that Detroit needs. With that said, Detroit still faces a long, up-hill climb.
Parking is not a profit engine. It is a service that should help local retailers, restaurants, and other businesses. It's a way to cycle traffic through and keep neighborhoods moving.
Detroit is a city being looted and stripped bare. If we decide that those who are weak and vulnerable will be sacrificed to protect the wealthy and the powerful, then no one is safe.
Why did Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr rush through a settlement that even the bankruptcy court found to be fundamentally out of balance while simultaneously pounding away at the public employee pensions?
When a federal bankruptcy judge ruled that municipal pensions are vulnerable under federal bankruptcy law, no one was surprised. Little about life in 21st-century America prepares anyone to expect a judge to stand up for public pensions.
In order to pay $1.44 billion into underfunded pensions, Kilpatrick and the city created nonprofit entities and corporations
Yet Snyder is eager to show progress in resolving the city's crisis before next year's election. “What I’d like to do is
Sadly, Governor Snyder's bankruptcy plan seems more about weakening unions and protecting corporate subsidies and tax breaks than it does about shoring up Motown for the long haul.
It's hard to imagine his worst fear, as he told it to WXYZ: "dying in my chair here [and] not being able to get out." According
Will the Detroit Institute of Arts' art collection really be privatized to pay the city's debts, or is the whole thing just a political gambit?
What could be more fitting than to use the DIA's collection to save the collection, to help save Detroit and to put politicians on notice that art matters?
The message we're sending other cities as well as our own citizens is it's OK to mismanage all of your money because the government will come riding in on the white horse to save you.
A community is made up of much more than just dollars and cents. Don't get me wrong: Detroit must make hard financial decisions. There's no way to hide from them or put them off any longer. But don't sell the soul of the community in the process.