Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is seeking permission to provide information to senators about the controversial CIA director nominee.
Army colonel effectively conspired to destroy evidence to defend Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, accused architect of the terror
It shouldn't have been such a difficult issue. After all, defendants on trial for mass murder in a death penalty case often aren't happy with how things are going. That may include being disappointed with their lawyers. But that's in federal court. The military commissions are different.
President Obama has been saying for the past eight years that he wants to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center. Although Congress hasn't made it easy, his insistence on continuing to prosecute these cases in the military commissions only undermines the credibility of his convictions.
If we're to accept George Santayana's dictum that those who forget the past are "condemned to repeat it," the U.S. should be extremely cautious about who we're arming and the deadly long-term effects that could easily blowback to the American homeland.
An Army judge at Guantanamo Bay on Thursday refused to allow one of the five defendants charged with orchestrating the 9/11 attacks to dismiss his lead lawyer, ruling the accused hadn't shown the necessary "good cause" to do so.
The hearing ensued in confusion, as the attorneys and judge argued over what the law is, who's required to explain it to the defendant and how bin Attash can inform the judge why he wants a new lawyer. Underlying the entire discussion was a sense that no one in the room knows all the relevant facts.
It's been an action packed week in Guantanamo's court, said a leading defense lawyer today without irony - even though there have only been a total of about five hours of public sessions this whole week in the case of the September 11 attacks, which took place 14 years ago.
Today's holdups were about who needs to know what. The prosecution team represents the government and gets to decide what classified information related to the case it shares with the defense teams and even with the judge.
We've all spent money on things we shouldn't have. As a teen, I blew my Saturday job earnings on a stud earring I thought would make me irresistible. A few weeks ago my brother-in-law impulse-bought a kilt. But the richer you are, the more spectacular the mistake you can make.
Dominating the Guantanamo war court today was yesterday's suggestion by Walid Bin Attash that he represent himself. He's accused of organizing an Al-Qaeda camp in Afghanistan where two of the September 11, 2001 hijackers trained, and is being charged with murder.
The judge swings gently on his high-backed black chair and orders a recess. We eventually reconvene over an hour later and the issue is about what sort of conditions Bin Attash can expect if he defends himself: Will he have access to a law library and other material? Will he be able to call lawyers for advice? This all seems unlikely given his current lack of access to his attorneys.
Transcribed with love by Courtney Eddington MLN: What was your first court sketch job? 9/11 DEFENDANTS WALID bin Attash, left
The military commissions have once again cancelled two weeks' worth of hearings scheduled in the case of the five alleged plotters of the September 11 attacks. Although the attacks themselves took place nearly 14 years ago, the five men accused of masterminding the deadliest terror attack to ever take place on U.S. soil are still nowhere near trial.
It's time for the U.S. government to put an end to this fiasco. The legitimacy of such important terrorism cases as the September 11 attacks is not something to be disregarded, nor is the impact on the victims' families, who have yet to see justice done. All the military commission cases could be reliably tried in the seasoned and successful U.S. federal court system.
It didn't take long for the Guantanamo military commission in the 9/11 case to stumble again -- this time when two of the accused co-conspirators said they recognized a translator in the courtroom from their time in a CIA black site.
Below is the original version of the Meet the Press interview before Cheney's people threatened Todd with a very cold, wet death if he didn't destroy it and re-interview him. Thankfully, Kim Jong-un's hackers were able to locate the original and make it public.
WASHINGTON, Dec 15 (Reuters) - The U.S. military on Monday canceled a pretrial hearing for the accused mastermind of the
How can it be that the US, which so prides itself on its traditions of respect for the rule of law and human rights, simply turn a blind eye on this deep stain on its record without the resonance of hypocrisy? How can it revive its moral credibility?