KIDS' TV

After appearing to suggest microwave ovens were used to spy on the Trump campaign, the President’s counselor Kellyanne Conway backtracked on her claims that the alleged wiretapping of Trump Tower by President Obama was more widespread than first thought.
Most parents of a toddler or preschooler know how excruciating some of their kids' choices in television shows can be. It
TV news is losing one of its coolest people. Linda Ellerbee, who has worked some of the more remote and interesting corners of the business for the last half century, is packing it in with a final edition of her Nick News for kids on Nickelodeon.
Caillou. Thomas. Elmo. Dora. TV is full of characters kids love but who drive parents up the wall. These shows have their positive qualities, from teaching real educational concepts to making kids laugh like crazy.
The new world of what we once called "television" is still sorting itself out, and it's a multi-front battle. Content needs to be both appealing and discoverable (hence, the draw of an iconic series like Sesame Street).
Hey, I'm Wishbone, the eponymous Jack Russell Terrier from the show, "Wishbone." I'm famous, but, just like you, I poop in the grass. I bark at strange objects. Just like you if you're a dog, I mean, because that's what I am.
Some say Eleni is foolhardy trying to combine a book tour with round-the-clock breastfeeding and a super-dramatic threenager. I say it's a good opportunity for me to have fun, refine my Grandma emergency kit and dredge up old college drinking songs to sing to Nicolas.
Kids' shows appear to be designed to drain parents of their last remaining shreds of sanity. Here are some of the ways in which they do it.
Fancy Nancy fans, rejoice! The beloved children's book series is going to be adapted into a television show. Variety reported