king abdullah

Last week I visited Jordan as guest of Prince Ali Bin Hussein and his wife, Princess Rym Brahimi Ali. Prince Ali is the third son of King Hussein, and half-brother of King Abdullah II. He is a member of the Hashemite family, which traces their ancestry directly to the prophet Muhammad.
We understand that part of the job of Secretary of State involves "diplomacy", that long-forgotten art of talking to people instead of drone-bombing them. And we recognize that being an effective diplomat means building cordial, constructive relationships, even with countries that lob off the heads of Hogwarts graduates.
As long as there is no real democratic solution in the Middle East, the Islamic State group will continue to mutate like a pathogen that has become antibiotic-resistant in the body politic of the Middle East. Each time it changes shape, it will become more virulent.
I reject the notion that FIFA cannot be reformed from within. The crisis at FIFA is a crisis of leadership.
Riyadh, America's nominal ally, has demonstrated that it is the more reckless of the two states, by executing an important Shia cleric and severing diplomatic relations with Iran.
The smile on Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu during his meeting with NATO ministers said it all.
Arriving back home in New York just one day before the attacks on Paris, I have since been struck by the dramatic polar opposites of the unconditional hospitality extended in Jordan, and the unfathomable acts of violence committed by ISIS.
There was no shortage of strange and notable presents from other nations. The mayor of Byblos, a town in Lebanon, gave U.S. Senators Tim Kaine (D-Virginia) and Angus King (I-Maine) each a 98-million-year-old fish fossil.
As Middle Eastern conflicts raise tension between Saudi Arabia and Iran, Pakistan will find it increasingly challenging to navigate through the turmoil while maintaining a meaningful balance in its relationships with Riyadh and Tehran.
In recent years, Turkey and Qatar have found much common ground on a host of foreign policy issues. Both Ankara and Doha have sponsored a variety of Sunni Islamist groups, seen as conduits for their geopolitical influence in the fluid Middle East. However, both countries have experienced setbacks from their engagement in some of the region's conflicts, most notably in Syria.