Kiribati

    Traditional taro pits can be used to grow nutritious vegetables for the entire household. Graham Lyons, Author provided
Taro, Choiseul Island Cook Islands [Upcoming blog next Sunday: South American and Caribbean sunsets] Futuna Fiji Niue ______________ By
Rock Islands, Palau Swimming With Fidel: The Toils Of An Accidental Journalist, available on Kindle, with free excerpts here
OO Warming Threatens The Great Barrier Reef Even More Than Thought - the iconic reef depends on protective pulses of warm
Is anyone else fed up with how "the news" is dominated by stories that provoke fear, panic and paranoia?
2015 has been a formative year for climate change and disaster management efforts. The Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction was adopted this year, and it culminates with COP 21 -- which aims to attain a global climate agreement.
From desertification to eroding shores, climate change has intensified resource scarcity, poverty and hunger. Vast new waves of migration may have a political ignition, but the fuel is climate change, from Africa to Asia. Somehow, even Syria's conflict can be attributed to the spark of longer-term drought.
The just-concluded Blue Ocean Festival and Conservation Summit aims to correct that imbalance. Blue offers a rare chance to see a range of long and short films exclusively focused on marine protection.
The Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), one of the world's largest marine protected areas, spanning over 400,000 km2, is our gift to humanity.
At the end of February the scenes in the South Pacific atoll island nation of Kiribati were dramatic and frightening. Waves crashed across the lagoon side of South Tarawa, the capital of Kiribati, swamping everything in their path.
This place is fascinating, but perhaps its lack of visitors is due to inaccessibility: flights are scarce, though Fiji Airways
Climate change is a problem that requires a global solution. And it is a problem that requires remarkable global leadership if it is to be adequately addressed. In spite of the unequivocal scientific information available, many people remain unprepared.
Tong said Kiribati's A$500 million sovereign wealth fund, built from earnings from phosphate mines, had suffered from poor
"Plagued by sea-level rise," "Besieged by the rising tide of climate change," and "Climate change destroys Pacific Island Nation" are the headlines you are most likely to stumble across. Sadly, this island nation, rose to fame as steadily as the level of seawater has been rising to consume their islands.
Clam chowder. Clam bake. Clam up. Tight as a clam. As happy as a clam. OK, but you don't normally associate the filter-feeding, plankton-feasting bivalve mollusc -- you probably won't use that term either -- with gems. Oysters, yes, but clams?
I left before learning how that one played out, but many decades later a visit to Fiji brought the memory bubbling back up
Abe-who? Not for nothing have some of the world's most famous authors dwelt literarily on and physically in the islands of
Must the destruction be measured only in massive political disruption? Or gross national product? Or vast economic loss? Or untenable cost of reconstruction? Or numbers of people killed or driven from their homes, never to return?
Despite mounting evidence that global warming is leading to devastating environmental disasters in the Pacific region, the U.S. and its partners are suspicious of climate change advocates. Rather brazenly, Washington and its Pacific allies spy on those who are intent on reining in global warming.
Unfortunately, catastrophes like Haiyan are likely to become more common in the coming years.