kleptocracy

Trump moves America further toward kleptocracy with each passing day.
They want inspectors general to keep the Trump administration from turning into a kleptocracy.
Of the many foreign policy pots and pans left neglected on the next President's stove, the one marked "Ukraine" may be ready to boil over.
I am struck by the bizarre statement by German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier about his disappointment with "NATO's provocation of Russia" because of the recent military exercise in Poland.
A very interesting narrative is taking shape in Kenya's latest "war" against corruption. The narrative advances the storyline that: Kenyans are corrupt because Kenyans are corrupt or as someone put it: "The problem has always been us, yes, me, you and every other individual who calls himself or herself a Kenyan."
At the risk of stating the obvious, there is a strong relationship between peace and stability on the one hand and strong/effective governance on the other.
Karen Dawisha is the Walter E Havighurst Professor of Political Science at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She is a world-renowned Russia expert who has written extensively about Soviet foreign policy, Russia-Middle East relations, and contemporary Russian politics.
Browder was the largest foreign investor in Russia until 2005, when he became blacklisted from Russia as a "threat to national security." He has since emerged as one of Putin's most strident critics, and a prominent human rights activist.
If money can buy elections, Montana's Senate race ended August 7 when the Democrat's candidate resigned. If a vibrant young working class candidate can corral the democratic process sufficiently, it began August 16.
Both men are taking a turn toward nationalism as they confront internal threats to their leadership. Both countries are facing a slowdown in economic growth that has been the cornerstone of popular support over the past decade, and both are seeing increasing public anger over corruption at the highest levels of government.