Kobani

Syrian Kurds have launched an unlikely radical experiment in governance without hierarchy, patriarchy or capitalism.
ISTANBUL -- Turkey's downing of a Russian military jet will help little in improving this much strained relationship. But it can clarify the basic political tensions which Turkey's Turkish and Kurdish politicians need to come to terms with, and get over, if they want to forge a new mode of coexistence inside Turkey's borders.
KUCUK KENDIRLI, Turkey (AP) — A Syrian woman and her two young sons who drowned on a desperate voyage from Turkey to Greece
But the threat from the Islamic State has forced changes in political calculations across the region, and analysts have suggested
Kurdish Rep. Rahman sits down with HuffPost's Akbar Shahid Ahmed to discussthe role of the Peshmerga in Kobani, Syria.
Reese Erlich is a foreign correspondent with GlobalPost and reports regularly for National Public Radio (NPR), the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC), and Radio Deutsche Welle. His reporting has earned him multiple awards over the years.
ISTANBUL -- Turkey's Kurdish movement has managed to survive and grow for 30 years in the Middle East, where politics is a dangerous business. Whether in Iran, Iraq, Syria or Turkey, the Kurds are now one of the key players in the Middle East, having won the world's admiration for their defeat of ISIS in Kobani. Secular, democratic and a champion of women's rights, the Kurdish movement has emerged as the most serious rival to radical groups like ISIS.
A Syrian seen near the wreckage left by fighting in the center of the Syrian town of Kobani (Ayn al-Arab) on February 18
The Turkish Army launched a military operation into Syria late Saturday to evacuate the Tomb of Suleyman Shah, which has
Late last month, ISIS was driven out of the Syrian city of Kobani, thanks to over 100 days of US-led airstrikes and the actions of Kurdish fighters. But this could also be bad news for other parts of the country and potential targets abroad, as this Sunni extremist organization reorients its focus. What can we expect of ISIS in the coming months?
“The problem is in Damascus,” he said, referring to the Assad regime. “That’s where it all started.” Al-Shamat closely monitors
Kurdish fighters stand in the center of the Syrian border town of Kobane, known as Ain al-Arab, on January 28, 2015. (Photo
(Adds details from Kobani, Turkish police prevent people reentering) Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan called for more international
Some Syrian activists question how committed the Kurds are to toppling the Syrian dictator. The Kurds, for their part, distrust Turkey, which supports the Syrian opposition. These debates and dynamics are mostly unknown to American progressives.
In the life of any country a situation can arise that requires a clear choice between positive change or stagnation and decline. At such times, only the collective will of the people can generate sufficient will to begin the process of change. And yes, sometimes the awakening of national consciousness begins with struggling over a mountain of dirty and snowy slush on the side of the road.
The reports, if confirmed, would illustrate that Turkey's ongoing reluctance to escalate pressure against the Islamic State
Canada's Globe and Mail newspaper also reported earlier on Monday that Kurdish media carried unverified statements from Rosenberg