kratom

A recent string of raids on Ohio kratom stores comes as the state weighs a ban on the botanical substance.
State officials have linked the herbal supplement to six deaths and claim most users are injecting it. A leading kratom scientist calls "B.S."
With the legal fate of kratom hanging in the balance, some health officials are pushing dubious claims about the herbal supplement's deadly risks.
Their stories offer a look at the potential consequences and challenges of a federal ban on the botanical drug.
After three days of meetings with congressional staffers, supporters say they have an uphill battle to keep their preferred treatment legal.
The order targets products distributed by Triangle Pharmanaturals, which refused a voluntary recall request.
The cases include a suicide and a drug overdose victim who tested positive for nine different substances.
The herbal drug "should be legal and available for those struggling with addiction," said Rep. Jared Polis.
Authorities claim the popular herbal drug poses potentially deadly risks, but there are big problems with their evidence.
The DEA had previously tried to ban it. Now the FDA is leading the charge.
Those who use and study the plant say an outright ban could do serious harm.
After DPA members and activists sent over 70,000 messages to Congress, 51 U.S. Representatives and almost a dozen Senators asked the DEA to postpone their ban.
The DEA should stop over-reacting to the relatively small, and mostly theoretical, safety risks of Kratom and pot and stop under-reacting to the daily tragedies caused by the often lethal products pushed so aggressively (and sometimes criminally) by drug companies.