kunduz hospital

Kathy Kelly (kathy@vcnv.org) co-coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org). Two major news stories here in
For the last hour, the American gunship had been circling high above the city, carefully observing its target with night
Like any good story, there's what happened -- and then there's the version you're asked to believe. Let's start with the first one.
While relatively few Afghans are anxious to see the Taliban's return, many seem willing to believe their promises to govern differently than in the past. Incidents like the strike on Kunduz's Doctors Without Borders hospital by American gunships can also serve to channel anger against a Kabul regime reliant on foreign troops.
We ought not to be blinded by media theater, or by habits of dismissing the doubts, and even the deaths, of countless people just like ourselves, overseas, whenever our government offers us its unsubstantiated explanations, its sincere good will, its apologies.
Doctors at the Kunduz hospital were meant to be catching up on their sleep in an underground bunker, but after five days