kyoto protocol

By Robert Glasser The Kyoto Protocol was adopted 20 years ago and since then we have seen an explosion of extreme weather
Like Big Oil, power companies have long seen the danger of fossil fuels, a new report finds.
At face value, the international deal has been described as a monumental moment in history. For the first time, 195 countries
After I've had an opportunity to reflect more calmly and carefully on the implications of the forthcoming Trump presidency for environmental, natural resource, and energy policy, I will return to this topic.
California can play a very important role by showing leadership -- in two key ways. One is to demonstrate a commitment to meaningful reductions in GHG emissions. In this regard, California has more than met the bar, with policies that are as aggressive as -- if not more aggressive than -- those of most countries.
There are a substantial number of issues that negotiators will eventually need to address, and likewise, there are a set of questions that researchers (including within the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements) can begin to address now.
ExxonMobil officials may hem and haw when reporters ask them if the company still funds climate science denier organizations, but the numbers don't lie.
The Paris Agreement provides an important new foundation for meaningful progress on climate change, and represents a dramatic departure from the past 20 years of international climate negotiations.
Wanting to accelerate low-carbon development and getting it done are two different things -- and the biggest challenge for the climate movement is to dramatically speed up successful implementation of the Paris commitments made by almost 200 nations.
Now that the handshakes, back slapping and self-congratulatory addresses are over, the cold hard reality of what wasn't achieved at the Paris Climate Change Conference is setting in.
At its core, the Paris agreement is about achieving specific, near-term, national mitigation targets that cover the vast majority of global emissions along, with provisions to regularly review, update, and strengthen those targets. We need specific targets for accountability.
Pledges from national governments alone may not be sufficient to solve this global existential challenge -- they must be backed up by action.
The myth that creating a clean economy will damage the economy is crumbling, and all countries -- but especially China and India -- are coming in with serious offerings. So barring some unforeseen problem, an agreement to reduce carbon emissions between now and 2030 will come to fruition.
While oil and coal interests can tie down national governments and prevent them from decarbonizing quickly, cities want to get on with the job -- and they are.
NEW DELHI -- At the Paris climate talks, the international community should resolve to phase out fossil fuel power plants and instead support biofuels and solar -- two technologies that have rapidly advanced to become competitive, efficient and sustainable.