labels

I guess the question is the following one : am I genuinely free when I am absolutely free to choose who I want to be? I'm
What I remember from that time, 40 years hence, was being acutely aware that part of my youth was going away. See, I was
Do you remember the song that accompanies the story? SHORT PEOPLE It didn't take him very long to fall asleep riding in the
The problem that all of this raises is that no single term is likely to be embraced by everyone, and most terms fall prey to the same problems as those we've already seen. They treat us as monolithic, negating our diversity and the multiplicity with which some people may identify.
It was all a test, in a way. I wanted to see if I mattered to her and if she would care that I didn't show up for our appointment
While I'm the first to encourage my fellow African-Americans to spread them transatlantic wings to hop across the pond and join me in Europe, there's a part that I'm always hesitant to open up about when it comes to the reality of our existence in some parts of the world.
We often define ourselves by transient labels that do not speak to the unchangeable, infinite Self that inhabits within us all.
Labels can feel validating -- as well as limiting -- but what labels really represent is the fact that most of us want to feel like we belong somewhere.
When she says "my gay brother" she doesn't seem to think twice about what that inflicts upon me, or what image that leaves in the minds of her friends. She also neglects the fact that no other trait is described that way.
Heroes aren't made in a mirror, they're made instead by allowing the inner beauty of their heart to reflect light to a world absolutely starved for it. Today, and as we move through this New Year, my challenge to us it to follow Alex's advice; to see ourselves as "just right." Let your inner beauty ignite hearts and reflect light into the world.
In truth, this work is not limited to a few people who dedicate their lives to serving others. We all have the ability to pause and reflect on who is standing before us at any given moment. And at that moment we are given a choice. We can choose to turn toward them rather than away.
On an even broader scale, looking at labels of sexuality is a great way to become increasingly aware of the countless other labels and stereotypes that surround us. It's important to constantly be conscious of the words we are using to identify others, and to ensure we are not using them in ways that negatively limit or categorize them.
I no longer think that what I have to say is unimportant and I no longer care if I think no one wants to hear it because frankly, I'm tired of being polite. So yes, I do have something to say so sit down and I refuse to wait any longer for someone to ask what I think.
You're the class clown, the good girl, the black sheep. At least, that's what you believe. Martha Beck explains why you're wrong—and how to be yourself instead.
I as guilty of stopping with surface identification as some people are when they just see my blindness and don't go beyond?
Caitlyn Jenner is more than a label in the culture wars; the complexity of her choice shines a light on the labels we affix to others and ourselves. Her choice would not be mine, but I celebrate and admire her. It is an invitation to live beyond the cheap grace of labeling others.