Labor Department

The man who's helmed Hardee's and Carl's Jr. could become the nation's top workplace watchdog. Best of luck, Fight for $15.
This is Repub's reaction to the Labor Department's proposal for new overtime rules that are expected to be introduced this
Over the past three decades, corporations virtually eliminated secure pensions, forced workers into risky, self-pay plans and handed hundreds of millions in tax-free retirement benefits to the top dogs. Pensions aren't dead; they're just exclusive now.
Officials say it could help end pay discrimination and close the gender wage gap.
In objecting to our op-ed on the importance of ensuring that financial advisors place their clients' best interest ahead of their personal profits, Dirk Kempthorne, the President and CEO of the American Council for Life Insurers, offers a misleading argument, built on a large, incorrectly cited number.
Until we agree, as a country, that the services provided by America's HHAs are worth finding the extra Medicare and Medicaid dollars to pay them what they deserve, then we will continue to suffer the negative consequences of piecemeal measures--however well-intended they may be.
The history of the American theater is closely woven into the history of American labor. During the tumultuous early years of the labor movement, the voices of workers often found their expression in the theater.
Addressing child labor is critical for responding to these wider challenges. And reducing child labor in supply chains is integral to the long-term sustainability of cocoa production.
The full proposal is now under review by OMB officials and won't be made public for at least several weeks. After it is published
So, join me in celebrating the women of labor's impressive achievements during this Women's History Month, but also in continuing their work long into the future. We owe it to Frances, all those who came before and all those who will come after.
The announcement that White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett and U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez will soon kick off a historic 'Lead On Leave' tour is exciting news that comes amidst strong, widespread demand and support for paid leave.
For most of its history, the Federal Reserve has been dominated by bankers and orthodox economists, who kill the recovery at the first sign of inflationary risks. Happily, the Fed today is led by Janet Yellen, a very uncharacteristic Fed chair who spent most of her career as a labor economist, of all things. Yellen is aware of the changes in the structure of labor markets and is unlikely to jump the gun on raising rates, though it's always possible that she could be outvoted. The risk today is not that an improving jobs picture will set off inflation. It's that even tight labor markets, by themselves, will not generate enough pressure for wage increases, because workers have lost so much bargaining power.
Hard as it may be for its legion of economic, political and media critics (and even some of its own members) to accept, the most recent bullish jobs report from the Labor Department looks like a ringing endorsement of Federal Reserve policies and perspectives on the economy.
The real story is that "help is on the way" for America's struggling middle class, the unemployed and the under-employed. The much maligned TARP stimulus and "extraordinary measures" of the Federal Reserve have finally and in fact -- worked!
Enabling more women to work through improved access to child care can also help mitigate the gender wage gap for lifetime earnings.
"The citations issued by OSHA are landmark," Celeste Monforton, an occupational health and safety expert, said in an email