lactation

Co-breastfeeding is not only a very real possibility for mothers like me -- it's absolutely amazing!
August is National Breastfeeding Month and if you're a nursing mom you know how breastfeeding can sometimes feel like the most frustrating and unnaturally difficult things you ever have to face as a parent.
Women who work in roles traditionally held by men often face stereotypes and unfair treatment on the job. This was certainly true for four Frontier Airlines pilots who filed complaints yesterday with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission after Frontier denied their right to accommodations for pregnancy and breastfeeding.
Make no mistake, however. There's nothing gender neutral about having a baby. Pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum recovery are strictly women's issues. Since healthy women are the foundation for producing healthy babies, the design of any family leave program must prioritize the needs of women over those of men.
I nursed my son for two years and I hope to do the same with my daughter. I fully believe that "breast is best" (at least most of the time), and I will gladly talk your ear off about the benefits of nursing. But would you believe me if I told you that I hated nursing so much that I almost quit?
To prepare for the arrival of my daughter, fourteen months old this Mother's Day, I turned to friends and family for advice on strollers, swaddles, bottles and more. Many had long lists of registry suggestions, from life-saving nipple cream to hands-free pumping bras (all very new to me).
The court documents note that Nationwide denied the allegations that Ames was told to make up for months of work in just
Many moms are not able to easily find other employment and they have to suffer through several work hours without pumping. Moms shouldn't have to deal with lactation mastitis because they are working to care for their child.
Bedsharing works so well because breastfeeding mothers and babies are hardwired to be together during vulnerable sleep periods.