lakota

The losing fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline has brought into high relief the dire living conditions of the Standing Rock Sioux and other Native Americans.
Fear of murderous immigrant invaders drove many voters' decisions at the ballot box this election year. When looking at the
“Tell your people to stop the Black Snake. Tell them they cannot back down.”
Americans who don't live in the West may think that the historic clash of Native Americans and pioneering settlers is long past. Not so. That classic American narrative is back big time, only the cowboys -- well, their right-wing representatives, anyway -- are on the warpath, trying to grab 640 million acres of public lands that they can plunder as if it were yesteryear.
In the more than 35 years I published a newspaper I can't remember how many obituaries I published of teenagers and younger
In the summer of 1998, only a month after I turned 20, I accidentally discovered that I was adopted. The experience threw me into an identity crisis. It also had the curious effect of teaching me about religious freedom.
They say that America is the land of the free. It's a principle upon which our nation was built, enshrined in the First Amendment and the national anthem taught in schools. But as I hiked into the woods to find a place to hide my sacred eagle feathers out of fear of being arrested, I wondered how free we really are.
The day to day things can take many forms. It can be something simple like chopping wood and providing security, but it can also mean many other things, like helping our elders, volunteering in our communities, being mentors and so much more.
As an adult, Lost Bird saw one child die and gave away another because she couldn't raise him. She died of syphilis and the Spanish flu on Valentine's Day, 1920, aged 29, and was buried in a pauper's grave in California.
This past week, I joined 11 other medical students from the University of Chicago in volunteering at a Lakota Native American reservation in South Dakota. The experience was a great opportunity to not only learn about health care challenges on reservations, but also to reflect on the intersections between religion, service, and medicine.
A close friend from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, home of over 40,000 Oglala Sioux, posted some devastating news on Facebook a few days ago.
In her short life,"Lost Bird" suffered every kind of injury and abuse the White Man imposed on Native Americans. She died on Valentine's Day in 1920, aged 29, and was buried in a pauper's grave in California, but 71 years later, her people, the Lakota, found her grave and brought her remains back to Wounded Knee, the place where she was found as an infant beneath her mother's frozen body.
Of all the stories I've uncovered while researching antique photographs in my collection, this one is the most heartbreaking. Starting with the Massacre at Wounded Knee on Dec. 29, 1890, "Lost Bird" suffered every kind of injury and abuse the White Man imposed on Native Americans.
There is no doubt that hate crimes against Native Americans are under-reported, or simply not reported at all. Perhaps it
My three children are Oglala Lakota. They grew up here on the Pine Ridge Reservation. If they hadn't, maybe they wouldn't have known about the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee. That's because Wounded Knee, the most famous catastrophe in Native history, is rarely taught in U.S. schools.
The Native American and Cowboy representatives of the Cowboy and Indian Alliance (CIA) held a small, private ceremony before
The doctor found bruises covering the boy's penis and scrotum. Those injuries would soon lead to an arrest warrant for the mother -- not because she had caused the harm, but because she did not return her son, along with his wheelchair-bound twin, to their abusers.
Activist, orator, and former 1996 and 2000 Green Party Vice-Presidential candidate Winona LaDuke introduced a new video on YouTube this week. Produced by Honor the Earth and narrated by LaDuke, "The Triple Crown of Pipeline Rides" revisits three horseback journeys by native riders and their supporters along oil pipelines.
As someone who believes all social justice issues are interrelated, here was a chance to take a stand in defense of families being torn apart by an immigration system that flies in the face of our nation's immigrant history, and the bedrock American value of justice for all.