lame duck

The Republican leading the charge says that when Congress comes back after November elections, "the American public gets screwed."
The basic Republican position isn't that hard to understand. It is: "We are going to deny Barack Obama a third Supreme Court pick, unless Hillary Clinton wins the presidency." That is precisely what some of them believe.
Obama's job approval polling average is now once again "above water" -- defined as more people who approve of the job he's doing than disapprove. This might not sound all that momentous, but it is actually the first time in almost three years that it has happened.
If he can't fill a Supreme Court vacancy, what else can't he do?
The Gipper called for "prompt hearings conducted in the spirit of cooperation and bipartisanship."
Obama is prevented from re-election by the 22nd Amendment, which has limited presidents to two terms since 1951. The public is strongly supportive of this restriction, but more divided in their perceptions of the effect of the two-term cap on presidential second terms.
A host of other tax benefits approved by the Senate finance committee in April would also be extended for two years. Those
Many are now pointing out that Warren's elevation pretty much assures she won't be running for president in 2016, but then we never really believed she would run in the first place. At this point, she'll be much more effective within the Senate Democrats.
Obama needs to strongly show that no election instantly changes what the two parties believe, and that all this talk of waving red flags cuts both ways.
Last night, Democrats got well and truly shellacked once again in a midterm election. It was so bad, it's pretty hard for Democrats to even attempt to gild the lily or spot that elusive silver lining. Republicans are consumed with glee, which they've well earned this year.
John Boehner knows that his party's chances to win national elections on the presidential level would be much improved by passing immigration reform. He also knows that this is not true for his House Republicans.
Obama to date has accomplished far too much in the face of far too much adversity. To try and stamp his administration with the label of failure is a horribly bad overplay of the supposed presidential second term hex.
... fill in the blanks: Teapot Dome, Watergate, Iran Contra, Lewinsky... Benghazi? You may have noticed that every time one erupts, it's compared in heinousness to the last really big one.
The more that the Obama Administration tries to meet the Republicans half way, the more extreme and implacable their demands become. Obama's term still has more than three and a half years to run and Democrats still have a 55-45 majority in the Senate, but the Republicans are treating him like the lamest of lame ducks. It should be clear by now -- meeting these people halfway only whets their appetite. In his remaining days in office, Obama can insist until the cows come home that he has been the president who tried to change the tone in Washington, to find areas of common ground and to show that there is more that unites Americans than divides us. But until he finds some inner toughness, the Republicans will continue to stymie his every move and he will be a feeble president at a moment when we need a resolute one.
I realize that all of the "wise men" of Washington are clamoring for a bi-partisan solution to fix the nation's deficit. But the plain fact is that the deficit is not a bi-partisan problem.
The decisions about avoiding the fiscal cliff may be complex, but the way to avoid the judicial cliff is not. It's time for the Senate to come together and in one simple vote set aside the rancor of the past and fulfill its constitutional obligation to ensure justice for all Americans.
After a hard-fought and divisive election year, it's time to rebuild America's middle class -- but to do it we need to make sure the lessons from this campaign stick.