land-rights

Around 2.5 billion people live, work, and depend on indigenous and community lands. They protect about half of the world's land, but have full ownership rights to just one-fifth of that. Why this massive gap?
Part of the problem is that it defines matrimonial property as only property that is jointly owned by the spouses. Given the predominant customs in Kenya, very little, if any, property will be considered matrimonial in nature under this narrow definition.
The government of India made a remarkable promise on October 11 last year. It was bold and broad, and it has the potential to strike a fundamental blow at the plague of landlessness and poverty that blights millions of Indians.
When President Koroma of Sierra Leone visits Washington this Thursday, President Obama will rightly praise his counterpart for a decade of democracy, and for recovering from a devastating civil war. But Sierra Leone's progress is precarious.
As a data-driven leader, for years I have carried a prejudice against the value and power of storytelling, often thinking of stories as too anecdotal, bordering on the shallow.
Sweeping change is often sparked by the most unlikely, seemingly small, ideas and items. This week at the Skoll Forum in Oxford, 1,000 people from around the world have been given a sneak peek at the newest of them.
Tis the season when hope for peace runs high. The season when I renew my commitment to creating a better world, based in large measure on the experiences of villagers across the globe, like the ones I met in Chillipoi.
It should be simple. A country ensures free education for all children, and everyone benefits. But we all know it's not that easy.
Land restitution is the ultimate goal in the protection of land that has been lost due to displacement.