Laudato Si

Of the many issues great and small that have rebounded in and out of the news cycle this election season, only one is immediately and monumentally crucial. In fact it's not science fiction to assert that the future of humanity depends on who becomes the next President of the United States.
Pope Francis hasn't been timid in speaking about these issues. In September, after publishing the aforementioned encyclical
Regardless of politics or personal belief, we must take seriously the "work" in "working class."
Pope Francis has said many important things in Laudato Si', and my critique should not detract from what is an excellent first foray by Catholic Church leadership into discussions of ecological degradation.
There could be no more urgent political or policy agenda. There are two global crises that are increasing exponentially in scale this year, trapped in a vicious reinforcing cycle, one making the other worse.
http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html The catch
On March 13th, Pope Francis begins his fourth year as bishop of Rome, and pastor to the world. His first three years have been riveting in many ways, drawing an exceptional amount of attention, even for a media-saturated age.
The year 2015 saw more than its fair share of extreme hydrologic events, both ruinous floods and severe drought. In the United States, attention remained focused on California, which is suffering the worst four-year drought on record.
These are responses to recent columns, in which I have tried to address the American and global hell created by the belief
Today it is the Pope himself being challenged as a heretic of sorts. He is a heretic to those who subscribe to the conventional, reductionist belief system that sees science as separate from spirituality, and religion as separate from politics and economics.
Pope Francis quietly sent along shoes of his own to Paris, proceeding to not-so-quietly warn world leaders against another tepid take to global warming. "We are at the limits of suicide" he affirms firmly; "It's now or never".
Should Rabbis speak out about the subordination of women in the Catholic Church and Catholic theology -- or is it entirely an internal Church question?
ROME -- Understanding the culture and history of a host country enables one to be accepted and heard there. Thus, Pope Francis could raise as gently as possible some of the most debated issues in the U.S. while still ending his speech in Congress with a standing ovation.
As a Catholic who observed closely the resignation of the emeritus pope and elevation of Jorge Bergoglio, in March of 2013, with hope and some suspicion, I find myself vexed by the profuse adulation Pope Francis I received during his visit to the United States.
Millennials of faith who care about animals have traditionally struggled to find a receptive ear in the church. When faced with the once in a lifetime opportunity to meet the Holy Father, we felt as though we were standing in their shoes.
This is good news for Fido and Kitty and the remaining lions in Hwange Game Reserve in Zimbabwe. And maybe for the rest of us, say spiritual advocates of animal welfare.
Pope Francis embodies the tenderness of God's mercy. From comforting families who lost loved ones on September 11 in New York City to proclaiming hope to the prisoners in Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in Philadelphia, Pope Francis has embodied God's tender mercy.
The Pope has said a great deal since he arrived in the U.S. Still, in this one, simple sentence before Congress, he brought together concepts of love, solidarity, right relationships, human dignity and even a "preferential option for the poor."
Pope Francisco's visit to Washington, DC, felt like a gust of fresh air. And he left us a rosary of unforgettable sentences, including my favorite one: "I am happy that America continues to be, for many, a land of 'dreams'."