law school admissions

Regardless of which law school you choose to attend, having more savings heading into law school is a good thing, as it will help reduce your overall debt load. How much it will help depends on a number of factors, including where you choose to go to school, but in the end, the principle holds true.
Interested law school applicants would do well to consider waiting a year or two to apply to law school. Law schools aren't going anywhere, and by waiting to apply, future applicants put themselves in a position to reap numerous benefits.
Should I go to law school? This is a question that every aspiring law applicant should ask themselves. There is no decision-tree or all-encompassing diagram that will be able to answer this question for everyone.
As a current student at Stanford Law School, I find myself frequently talking to current prospective law students wanting to know what they should be doing now to get into a top law school. My immediate response is always the same: strengthen your GPA and crush the LSAT.
Law schools should have reduced their class sizes long ago. Or at a minimum, we ought to have done our part to set realistic expectations. Even in a boom economy, only a minority of graduates from a minority of law schools were competitive for the entry-level slots at the one hundred largest law firms.
"Although it's a daunting time for jobs, there has never been a better time to apply to law school," Jay Shively, Wake Forest
After networking with people in countless industries, I began to learn that the most successful people -- those who earn satisfaction from their careers -- don't arrive anywhere via plans. There is no entryway to adulthood or happiness or success.
Law school admissions officers should grade applications on a socioeconomic curve, and remember that wealth -- dishing out $1,200 - 9,000 for a prep class -- should not be a precondition of acceptance.