learning spanish

Anyone who grew up around Spanish speakers might be used to hearing these idioms, but when you stop and think about it their
When we first moved to Latin America, back in 2001, our Spanish language skills were minimal. We had what we call 'restaurant and taxi' Spanish, allowing us to get where we were going (usually a restaurant) and order our food once we got there.
So, you're thinking of retiring to Latin America, are you? Then you'd best learn some Spanish. At least a little, por favor. Pantomime works, yes, but only so far -- and at what damage to your self-respect?)
Twenty years after my first class at Casa Hispana, I began my translation of Pablo Neruda's "100 Sonnets of Love," a collection of sonnets written to Neruda's wife Matilde. Each one of these poems is a flash of light, a lightning strike of love.
I am taking Spanish lessons over the Internet. And as much as I'd like to pretend that my life is a Nora Ephron film, this has turned out to be no You've Got Mail-esque scenario.
When you're standing in the store with a line of people behind you and the cashier mumbles something like quatromilledoscientoscinquenta and it sounds like quatromillcan'tyouevencountyoustupidstupidgringo, it's a bit nerve-wracking.
You may not realize it, but the U.S. is becoming a bilingual nation. Today, more than 37 million people speak Spanish at home. Pause and think about that number: For 37 million people in the U.S., speaking Spanish is more comfortable than speaking English.
Chilean Spanish is hard (for me). Guatemalan Spanish is slow, deliberate. Guatemalans pronounce all their letters. I got over-confident with my Spanish level.