leelah alcorn

In my own not-so-humble opinion, it is not possible to vote Republican in support of LGBT rights.
My role, as defined by the virtue of my identities, is much larger than what fits in my syringe each week. I wear it on my body and express it on my tongue. And I do it for those who came long before me and for those voices who have yet to be, or can't be, heard.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has addressed the issue of suicide in LGBT populations, and reached the
The new law links the controversial practice to consumer fraud.
So far, only California, New Jersey, and Washington, DC have banned conversion therapy for minors. There are bans pending in other states, but Republicans continue to vote them down -- as happened in Virginia recently. Still, people spoke up, via a petition, and the White House listened. And that, people, is what we call a very good start.
It was exactly a year ago when I allowed myself to be fully seen by the world as the woman that I am: a proud transgender female. For a long time, I was paralyzed by fear in accepting my truth. I finally decided that I could not be paralyzed anymore. I realized that to accept vulnerability is to allow your authenticity to shine.
When I was forced to stop looking at my identities as if they exist in a vacuum, I realized that being a black trans woman is a major risk and accepting myself would be just the first battle with a society obsessed with compartmentalization.
There is a larger educational point that needs to be said loud and clear for the benefit of other families and for transgender or gender nonconforming youth. That message is simple: For transgender youth, access to health care services saves lives.
In memory of Leelah and our loved ones who have died, and in honor of Susan and those who come out each day as a transgender person, let's try to treat people of all genders, no genders, multiple genders and of various gender expressions as fully human and made in God's image.
When kids come home from school feeling unwanted, they should be able to come home feeling accepted for who they are. This tragedy should not have happened, but because it has, parents should be more aware of their kids' feelings.
Jane Clementi, the mother of Tyler Clementi, took to the Internet this week to take a stand about Alcorn's high-profile suicide
For parents of kids who are transgender, gender education alone isn't going to provide that reassurance. What I think would really help are more everyday success stories -- people who can show trans kids, their parents and society as a whole that being transgender doesn't have to forever define you (unless you want it to).
The right is pushing hard on talking points claiming that transgender teens need to be pushed into (religious) "therapy" that no reputable, licensed mental-health professional would provide. Their rationales are riddled with half-truths, logical fallacies, and outright lies. Here are the facts.
It was beyond moving to stand among that crowd, where love and acceptance was so immense and intense. Just as Leelah's note asked that her death really mean something, I say to her now that your death does mean something.
Doing something that is totally inconsistent with previous behavior and runs counter to personal philosophical and spiritual beliefs can nonetheless free one to live in a more positive and healthful manner. It's not a cure-all, but it gave me the tools to overcome stigma, live authentically in service to others, and not see myself as a victim.
A video message about the passing of Leelah Alcorn. A word to parents worldwide. And a message to the LGBTQ youth of the world. Don't let go.
We don't have to be the same to give each other credit and respect. We don't have to be bossy to teach. Our differences challenge us, but also enrich us.
Leelah please hear this: Your death has meant something and because of you brave beautiful Leelah society is being fixed. There has been an overwhelming amount of support for you. Society has listened dear Leelah and you have NOT gone unnoticed.