Lewis Carroll

Roland Kupers wants students to develop the kind of habits conducive to understanding their world in all its complexity. We
5 Years later, it is once again time for a little madness..... Last year, the British Library (the original manuscript's
Have you ever emerged from a posh department store like say Bergdorf Goodman and wished that a brigade of ISIS terrorists
Life is a chaotic carousel constantly spinning and it's our job to learn how to grab ahold of the moving poles because the carousel never stops. Years are spent grieving, years are spent falling in love, years are spent working and chasing dreams, and some years are spent in such pain, you have practically fallen off the carousel.
The book would change Carroll's life forever, but it might never have happened if a young girl had not inspired the previously unpublished children's book author to write one of the greatest children's books of all time.
Elizabeth Gilbert and Lev Grossman were voracious readers as kids.
Before breakfast, some may believe six impossible things, but we offer you seven real things: little-known insights into that special combination of madness and sanity, maturity and childhood that was Alice.
Carroll's diaries make no mention of drugs. We know that he occasionally enjoyed a glass of sherry and may have taken opiate-infused drug Laudanum (which was readily available to everyone in the 1860s). Other than that, there's nothing connecting Alice and drugs.
In the middle of the terrace barbecue, I was thinking about Alice, Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson Airplane, and the White Rabbit, all marching to the tune of their own inner fife and drummers. All in the name of Independence.
It's a warm spring evening in Central Park and a group of teens are gathered at the Alice in Wonderland statue, just up from the boating lake. For most of them, frolicking on the iconic statue is probably something they haven't done in a while. But today the teens don't hold back.
In honor of Mother's Day, we asked The New York Public Library's extraordinary bibliophiles to discuss the books their moms would recommend and we were promptly deluged with stories of wonderful moms near and far who taught their children to love the written word.
"Pick up anything Martin Gardner wrote," advises mathematician, magician and MacArthur award winner Persi Diaconis. "You'll smile and learn something." This is very true, but with over 100 books to choose from, by Gardner's own estimation, where should one start?
The Alice Tarot gets its distinctive lush look from the Baba team's unique approach to illustration. Each card is based on photographs of places, animals, objects, and costumed people, collaged into seamless tableaux and blended through skillful illustration.
L to R: President of the LCSNA Mark Burstein with C. M. Rubin and Craig Yoe The LCSNA has a diverse membership composed of
After five seasons, The Syfy Network's Warehouse 13, one of TV's most inventive science fiction series -- a smart, entertaining mix of drama, humor, the supernatural and time travel -- will air its final episode this Monday night, May 19. And I am thrilled to report it's going out on a high note.
Maybe it's because the authors lived here, but dozens of classic books for kids are set in the center of New York. Crickets in their pages hang out, not in cornfields, but in Midtown. Mice don't run down country lanes: They sail boats in Central Park.