lgbt people of color

In the next few days we are headed home for the holidays, something often traumatic in itself. We may get misgendered or be subject to countless other forms of discrimination; now we must spend time with family members who have voted against us and we feel that much more emotionally vulnerable.
As an adult, there is nowhere I feel safer than in the arms of my partner. Today, I held her close as she shed tears at a vigil in Jackson Heights in honor of the Orlando victims. That safety, too, has been compromised. Today, I feel unsafe, and there is nowhere to turn.
The truth is, I don't fit. And maybe neither do you. Maybe you keep tweezers in your car to pluck the hairs from your chin. Maybe you have no idea how to do this thing called life. Maybe you make it up as you go.
Break-ups can be the pits, and they can also be incredible opportunities for personal and relational growth. I applaud anyone and everyone who has made the choice this year to part with someone to make space for something new. I honor you.
Is this to be the brave new gay world? A world in which the public face of the queer community -- the gay, the white, the cisgender and the wealthy -- take their place among society's elite, leaving the transgender, the non-white, the poor and the homeless to fend for themselves?
In a world that is saturated in patriarchy and gender based violence, imagine how powerful and life saving it would be if men, masculine presenting people and cis-gender identified people started standing up as allies too.
In 2015, we are seeing a disturbing uptick in this trend. We have already seen three homicides of trans women of color in January alone. If we are going to act to prevent one more trans woman of color from losing her life, we must act now.
The overwhelming failure of so many LGBT organizations to mention the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act is a symptom of a larger problem, and until more LGBT organizations start showing up more consistently and visibly for folks of color, they will keep questioning the motives of the movement.
This week a disturbing story reached the light of national attention. We learned that Scott Esk, an Oklahoma Tea Party Republican candidate for the state House, had endorsed the stoning of gay people.
But athletes like Sam, Griner, Collins and Gordon are changing this. By boldly coming out in such public ways, they have become -- for many people -- the faces of the LGBT moment, and they are challenging assumptions about what the LGBT community looks like.