LGBT writers

Do you know who the best gay writer we have today is? Unless you are gay, I'll bet you have never heard of him, much less
New York's Oscar Wilde Bookshop, which opened in 1967 and was previously the nation's oldest bookstore dedicated to LGBT
"We didn't have any LGBT list at all when I started as acquisitions editor [at the University of Wisconsin Press], but the real leap for us was incorporating more trade titles into our list.... And once I got the OK to do trade titles, I just saw so many strong LGBT titles going unpublished."
American culture is perceptibly aging. This was evident April 27 when West Hollywood celebrated Lambda Literary Foundations 25th annual benefit "A Celebration of LGBT Literary Pioneers." The evening was a smashing success, often touching beyond belief, and had standing room only.
While A Horse Named Sorrow is a meditative tale set in San Francisco, Faun focuses on an adolescent boy discovering that his body is quickly morphing, but not into the expected stage of puberty. Healey was able to take some time with me to discuss his work and inspirations.
I am extremely proud of my identity within the LGBTQ community, and publicizing Queer Greer is currently one of my favorite joys. I readily characterize myself as a "queer" writer, irrespective of the topics I am writing on at any given time.
Recently, a few of us connected to discuss our craft and the state of gay literature today. It was with great pleasure that I joined with Gregory G. Allen, David G. Hallman, Carey Parrish, and Arthur Wooten in our own gay take on the Algonquin round table.
Larkin's "My Body: New and Selected Poems" (Hanging Loose Press), received the Publishing Triangle's Audre Lorde Award. Her