libya revolution

Khalifa Haftar could be the next Assad if the U.S. and EU don't act fast.
DAMMAM, Saudi Arabia --The first time I visited Benghazi was in the summer of 2011, five months into the revolution. I was exploring the city and recalling the many stories my father told me about his home as I was growing up. None of his recollections could have prepared me for what I found -- a resilient city bursting with newfound energy. This is the Benghazi I remember. Three months later, Gaddafi was seized and killed by rebel forces, and the National Transitional Council declared Libya free.
The Libyan people are disillusioned and have lost faith in their politicians to manage the country effectively. There is now a general sentiment that Libya has to urgently find an alternative way to fix the country or face pandemonium.
Salaheddin Sury, a professor at the Centre for National Archives and Historical Studies in Libya, told National Geographic
With political parties banned even before Gaddafi seized power in 1969, Libyans have precious little experience of anything
The challenges Libya faces are not just about uniting a fractured society. They are also about building responsive and accountable governance institutions out of the ashes of the skeletal ministries left behind.
Syria is headed down the path of a protracted, disastrous civil war that could last for another year or more. This revolution has been mismanaged from its inception and if drastic measures aren't taken to change course it will be a disaster.
Though the revolution united most Libyans, the inspiration driving revolutionary groups to fight against the Gaddafi regime was not the same.
Few would dispute women's role in the revolution. The question on women's minds today is whether it is sustainable or not.
There is sharia, and then there is sharia. And before going on and on about regression and glaciation, we would do well to know what we're talking about.