libya revolution

DAMMAM, Saudi Arabia --The first time I visited Benghazi was in the summer of 2011, five months into the revolution. I was exploring the city and recalling the many stories my father told me about his home as I was growing up. None of his recollections could have prepared me for what I found -- a resilient city bursting with newfound energy. This is the Benghazi I remember. Three months later, Gaddafi was seized and killed by rebel forces, and the National Transitional Council declared Libya free.
The Libyan people are disillusioned and have lost faith in their politicians to manage the country effectively. There is now a general sentiment that Libya has to urgently find an alternative way to fix the country or face pandemonium.
When we got our independence in 1951, it was something we got almost for free. This time the young people paid for it in
In schools, the Brotherhood were called "wayward dogs", an insult they have struggled to shake off along with lingering suspicions
The challenges Libya faces are not just about uniting a fractured society. They are also about building responsive and accountable governance institutions out of the ashes of the skeletal ministries left behind.
Syria is headed down the path of a protracted, disastrous civil war that could last for another year or more. This revolution has been mismanaged from its inception and if drastic measures aren't taken to change course it will be a disaster.
Though the revolution united most Libyans, the inspiration driving revolutionary groups to fight against the Gaddafi regime was not the same.
Few would dispute women's role in the revolution. The question on women's minds today is whether it is sustainable or not.
There is sharia, and then there is sharia. And before going on and on about regression and glaciation, we would do well to know what we're talking about.
Yesterday, history was made in Libya and Libya is free after decades of brutal dictatorship. I was in Tripoli and Benghazi only 2 weeks ago visiting some of the bravest young people I have ever met.
After Libyan rebels captured Muammar Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte on Thursday, reports surfaced that the ousted Libya leader
Now he's back at school in Los Angeles and getting ready to graduate in May. Jeon sat down for an interview with CBS, revealing
With the overthrow of Moammar Gaddafi, Libya has a whole new political spectrum that covers a formal transitional government to remnants of the monarchy. Each will play some telling role over the next few months.
How many revolutions will it take before the world's dictators, tyrants and despots realize that one man or one unjust system cannot contain the strength of the human spirit?
The Libyan historical and spiritual heritage dominating the anti-Gaddafi campaign has drawn on precedents that could not be more distant from the radicalism of al Qaeda.
Muammar Gaddafi's 42-year dictatorship is hanging by a thread, most of his family is either under arrest or in exile, and rebels are celebrating their impending victory in virtually every village, town and Tripoli neighborhood. It's like Iraq in March 2003. But things in Iraq changed quickly. We know from that experience that now isn't the time for celebration. If the Libyan people don't learn from the mistakes the U.S. made in Iraq, they could repeat the violence that has wracked that country for the past eight years. In short, it's a time to worry about Libya's future.
"It's over, frizz-head," chanted hundreds of jubilant men and women massed in Green Square, using a mocking nickname of the
Barack Obama's gamble in providing limited support for a conflict in Libya, in which other countries played lead roles, now seems like a winning move.
"We received weapons by sea from Benghazi. They sent us weapons in boats," said Ibrahim Turki, a rebel in the Tripoli neighborhood