license plate readers

Simply by liking or sharing this article on Facebook or retweeting it on Twitter, you're most likely flagging yourself as
"The unborn person doesn't have constitutional rights."--Hillary Clinton, Meet the Press (April 3, 2016) Unfortunately, as
Surveillance is about power. Vigilant gives the NYPD power to monitor our whereabouts. By demanding answers to critical questions about NYPD's use of surveillance tools, New Yorkers can begin to take back the power imbalance created by the new era of mass digital surveillance.
In an age of too many laws, too many prisons, too many government spies, and too many corporations eager to make a fast buck at the expense of the American taxpayer, there is no safe place and no watertight alibi.
The warning signs are all around us. The question is whether you will organize, take a stand and fight for freedom, or will you, like so many clueless Americans, freely walk into the slaughterhouse?
On any given day, the average American going about his daily business will be monitored, surveilled, spied on and tracked in more than 20 different ways, by both government and corporate eyes and ears.
With the robust privacy protection of DPPA, the misuse of personally identifiable information can be avoided, but restricting its access carries potentially devastating consequences.
The revelations by Edward Snowden only scrape the surface in revealing the lengths to which government agencies and their corporate allies will go to conduct mass surveillance on all communications and transactions within the United States.
Tens of thousands of these devices are now installed across the country, with many more on the way. Unlike red-light cameras, these readers capture and store images of every vehicle that crosses their field of vision.
Civil liberties advocates sued the Los Angeles Police and County Sheriff's Departments on Monday to gain access to records from automated license plate readers that may be collecting millions of motorists' daily movements. They say the devices, which have already logged 160 million "data points" in Southern California, threaten omnipresent, warrantless surveillance of ordinary citizens' movements.
But the public is little-informed on the surveillance technology, which has already aroused controversy from San Diego to
Hats off to Jon Campbell of the San Diego CityBeat for writing this incisive feature on how license plate recognition in