life without parole

Jason Hernandez never thought he would see the outside world again.
Commentary on Brooker's ordeal has focused exclusively on the shockingly harsh punishment for such a relatively minor non
Judge H. Lee Sarokin wrote: "The Guilty Have a Better Chance for Parole or Pardon Than the Innocent." As an innocent prisoner, I've witnessed this myself for the last two decades (and counting). The only thing that has changed over time is that more and more corruption is being exposed. The
Thousands of individuals who were subjected to harsh penalties as children now have the possibility of release. The question now remains of what their future entails.
When prosecutors and judges feel comfortable sending each other racist and sexually explicit emails for fun, something is wrong. This same cozy and corrupt system allowed my innocence to be swept under the rug for years. It's time for accountability and justice for me and so many others who have suffered from wrongful convictions.
Bryan Stevenson is unwavering in that vision and in lifting his voice of great moral clarity at the forefront of the struggle. Every new hard-earned and overdue victory should remind us all that we must keep moving towards greater justice for all.
Like the Court's decision in Montgomery v. Louisiana, President Obama's action sends a strong message about the vulnerability of youth and our obligation as a society to safeguard children, even when they commit crimes.
Under the Constitution, those sentenced as minors to mandatory life imprisonment without the possibility of parole may get a new day in court.
The Supreme Court may punt on the issue of life imprisonment for minors.