lilly ledbetter

The pay gap has trapped generations of women. But there’s another way.
A lesson for women on getting paid fairly from equal pay pioneer Lilly Ledbetter and NYC First Lady Chirlane McCray
Eight years ago today, landmark legislation was enacted in the name of women’s equality activist Lilly Ledbetter to advance
Donald Trump's selection of Indiana Governor Mike Pence as his vice presidential nominee speaks volumes about just how dangerous a Trump Administration would be.
On June 14, 2016, I had the opportunity to attend the first ever United State of Women Summit hosted by the White House. I was excited to attend this monumental event but nothing could have prepared me for the imprint the summit would have on me and the other five thousand women in attendance.
This past Tuesday, at the White House-convened United State of Women Summit, I was on energy overload. It was a day of inspiring speeches by on-the- ground trailblazers and the thrilling moment when President Obama called himself a feminist. Yet for me, the most exciting, kick-off news was this: The White House made visible its "Equal Pay Pledge".
Americans will spend $22 billion on Mother's Day this year. $22 billion. That's $258 for each of the 85 million U.S. moms. Why not just give them the money. Even though it won't make a dent in the disparity of income between moms and dads, at least it's something. They deserve it, right?
Today we recognize Equal Pay Day, a day that symbolically represents when a woman's wage finally catches up to what a man was paid in the previous year. Despite often being equally qualified, a man's pay outpaces a woman's by 79 cents for every dollar.
She called on Congress directly to change the law. Then they did.
It's pretty obvious, but weirdly unacknowledged.