lilly ledbetter fair pay act

This past Tuesday, at the White House-convened United State of Women Summit, I was on energy overload. It was a day of inspiring speeches by on-the- ground trailblazers and the thrilling moment when President Obama called himself a feminist. Yet for me, the most exciting, kick-off news was this: The White House made visible its "Equal Pay Pledge".
It's Mother's Day and this election has me thinking about mothers past, present, and future -- and what I will say to my future grandchildren if they ask me what happened to our democracy and to civility in 2016.
Today we recognize Equal Pay Day, a day that symbolically represents when a woman's wage finally catches up to what a man was paid in the previous year. Despite often being equally qualified, a man's pay outpaces a woman's by 79 cents for every dollar.
I stand with President Obama's executive action issued today to require companies of 100+ to disclose pay according to gender. As a Congresswoman, I will fight for the Paycheck Fairness Act to pass, allowing women to further help in ensuring equal pay for equal work.
Officials say it could help end pay discrimination and close the gender wage gap.
Librarians. Clerical Workers. Janitors. More than 1,500 municipal workers decided that enough was enough, and dared to demand respect and justice. They decided they would strike.
The time is long overdue that we eliminate all gender discrimination in America. As we're pushing for equal pay, we must also seek to finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution.
And praises an oft-forgotten advocate for women.
At the Third National Conference of Commissions on the Status of Women on June 30, 1966, 28 women banded together with a
My recent travels to the South made me curious about women and their contributions from the Southern states.