lilly ledbetter fair pay act

This past Tuesday, at the White House-convened United State of Women Summit, I was on energy overload. It was a day of inspiring speeches by on-the- ground trailblazers and the thrilling moment when President Obama called himself a feminist. Yet for me, the most exciting, kick-off news was this: The White House made visible its "Equal Pay Pledge".
It's Mother's Day and this election has me thinking about mothers past, present, and future -- and what I will say to my future grandchildren if they ask me what happened to our democracy and to civility in 2016.
Today we recognize Equal Pay Day, a day that symbolically represents when a woman's wage finally catches up to what a man was paid in the previous year. Despite often being equally qualified, a man's pay outpaces a woman's by 79 cents for every dollar.
I stand with President Obama's executive action issued today to require companies of 100+ to disclose pay according to gender. As a Congresswoman, I will fight for the Paycheck Fairness Act to pass, allowing women to further help in ensuring equal pay for equal work.
Officials say it could help end pay discrimination and close the gender wage gap.
Librarians. Clerical Workers. Janitors. More than 1,500 municipal workers decided that enough was enough, and dared to demand respect and justice. They decided they would strike.
The time is long overdue that we eliminate all gender discrimination in America. As we're pushing for equal pay, we must also seek to finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution.
Forty-nine years ago today, something awesome happened. Here are eight things that the organization has successfully helped
My recent travels to the South made me curious about women and their contributions from the Southern states.
Mother's Day is about thanking moms for everything they do for their children. But I'm also thankful for everything Democrats do for moms. As a society, we must be committed to empowering moms to make those tough decisions and to create opportunities for them to succeed.
Rudy, let's break down your statement. When you say that "I do not believe that the president loves America," what indication do you have or what criteria are you using? I really want to know.
With the shifting workforce in this country, many of these women are increasingly the financial head of their household. Women are working to pay their bills, put food on the table for their families, and slowly chip away at their mounting debt and student loans.
Women are looking for a fair shot at a good job that can support them and their families and give them a chance at a brighter future. We can't ask women to lead when they can't feed their families, worry about how to pay their debts, or wonder how they can afford child care. Our country is successful when women are successful.
Members of Congress, don't just say you support equal pay and then use gridlock as an excuse for continued inaction. It's time to walk the walk. Seize this broad public and political support as an opportunity to come together and move forward on one of the most fundamental economic issues of our time. Families are tired of waiting.
I was 12 years old during the historic Year of the Woman in 1992. I remember the sense of hopefulness my Mom and her feminist friends had as they talked about the possibilities for discussion, action and policy around women's equality.
At Wednesday's White House press briefing, press secretary Josh Earnest admitted that "the White House has some improvement
Dr. King famously said, "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice." The Civil Rights Act changed the face of the nation, bending the arc sharply on July 2, 1964. But much work remains. On the 50-year anniversary of its passage, let us rededicate ourselves to the task of building a fairer, more just society.