Lionel Shriver

It's hard to classify Lionel Shriver's latest novel, The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, as futuristic dystopian fiction if for no other reason than the present direction and momentum of the U.S. could bring us something like Shriver's vision in a decade or so.
It’s hard to classify Lionel Shriver’s latest novel, The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, as futuristic dystopian fiction
Renee Knight worked for the BBC directing arts documentaries before turning to writing. She has had television and film scripts commissioned by the BBC, Channel Four, and Capital Films. Disclaimer is Renee's first novel.
Considering the fact that women remain woefully underrepresented in the literary world, it came as a pleasant surprise today that this year's prestigious BBC National Short Story Awards shortlist is entirely -- as in 100 percent -- dominated by females.
People react to the idea of women not having children with total incredulity, shock, and worst of all, pity. They assume
After a series of little-known novels throughout the 1990s, Shriver burst into the public conscience with the Orange Prize-winning We Need to Talk About Kevin in 2003. Her latest novel, Big Brother, is a sobering look at obesity and its effect on relationships.
During the long year that The Forever Marriage was circulating, I sought out portraits of imperfect but redeemable women.
Between my debut and this book, an entirely different novel and a few other partial manuscripts had languished: unfinished, unloved. No wonder I've always been drawn to stories of other novelists with unpublished or simply abandoned novels.
The film hasn't received any Oscar nominations, but Ramsay demonstrates that her uniquely Scottish sensibility translates remarkably well stateside.
Bigotry. Intolerance. Censorship. Not words that you would normally associate with a literature festival. Yet, over the last six days at the Jaipur Literature Festival, they've dominated panel discussions, been whispered during readings, and littered furious debates around tea stalls.
To describe the Jaipur Literature Festival as the rambunctious love-spawn of the mercantile-minded Frankfurt Book Fair and free-spirited Woodstock barely scratches the surface of this spectacle.
One of the hot properties at Cannes was the film version of Lionel Shriver's bestselling We Need to Talk About Kevin, but
Like we did last year, we're going to have a little fun comparing the U.S. and U.K. book cover designs of this year's Rooster
If women's books aren't reviewed, when women's books are declared "less literary, and when women's books on family are declared women's fiction, while men's domestic books are declared brave and eye-opening, it adds many pounds to the micro-inequality pile.
With her new novel, So Much for That, Lionel Shriver strengthens her already credible claim to the title of best living American
As Hilary Mantel's Booker prize-winning novel Wolf Hall enters the final straight on even odds to take the Orange prize this
"The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them," Elif Batuman The New York Times "So Much for
"The Lunatic Express," Carl Hoffman The Wall Street Journal "The Infinities" ends with a hopeful surprise, but what we may