Literary criticism

Jeanine Cummins' book has been lauded by Stephen King and Lauren Groff, but also lambasted as "problematic," "harmful" and "brownfacing."
Which books define our postmodern age 200 years from now depends on two primary factors: the critical assessments of our
Why the name, you might ask. Manasia says they were thinking of Henry David Thoreau's Walden, and, in particular, that they
All great authors know that a killer first line is almost more important than the first few pages, and authors put in hours of work just to get the right sentence on paper.
I consider myself to be fairly well read. Admittedly, I am only twenty-four but for the better part of the past decade, I have consistently read one hundred or so books each year
David Morrell's latest novel, Inspector of the Dead, is a sequel, featuring De Quincy and his iconoclastic daughter, Emily. When a killer begins targeting London's elite, Scotland Yard again seeks De Quincy's help.
I feel too many women -- poets or not -- are asked to explain themselves, their bodies, their desires. I want to present a world which is already stripped down; its foundation is that it does what it wants. I would like that of my life in many ways.
Reading all of the foregoing, one might wonder, "How can metamodernism claim to enable a vertical layering of ideas and identities in which no idea or identity is privileged over the others, when by all rights that should be both a physical and metaphysical impossibility?"