Literary criticism

Writer Cynthia Ozick laments the state of affairs in a 2011 commentary in the National Book Critics Circle blog. "Increasingly
This essay originally appeared in Best American Poetry. Here's how it goes. The poems are printed and placed on all the tables
All great authors know that a killer first line is almost more important than the first few pages, and authors put in hours of work just to get the right sentence on paper.
I consider myself to be fairly well read. Admittedly, I am only twenty-four but for the better part of the past decade, I have consistently read one hundred or so books each year
David Morrell's latest novel, Inspector of the Dead, is a sequel, featuring De Quincy and his iconoclastic daughter, Emily. When a killer begins targeting London's elite, Scotland Yard again seeks De Quincy's help.
I feel too many women -- poets or not -- are asked to explain themselves, their bodies, their desires. I want to present a world which is already stripped down; its foundation is that it does what it wants. I would like that of my life in many ways.
Reading all of the foregoing, one might wonder, "How can metamodernism claim to enable a vertical layering of ideas and identities in which no idea or identity is privileged over the others, when by all rights that should be both a physical and metaphysical impossibility?"
The first major change in metamodernism since 2010 is a growing feeling that "metamodernism," as a system of logic, is a recurring phenomenon rather than one that's especially tied to a single moment in world history.
The politics of literary metamodernism presently resides in the same transitional and paradoxical state that the work itself does, and that its authors most certainly do.
In Cheap Signaling -- a serious and important study of poetic diction in the avant-garde -- Daniel Tiffany posits a revolutionary poetics without positing, too, a paradigm shift away from postmodernism.
Fear means you know you may be incorrect. You may find that when you read your poem as you -- when you abandon those auto-subscribed notions of sound and musicality -- you will reach and offer a much deeper attachment to your work.
I saw the announcement for the 2012 Top Cow Talent Hunt on some site or another and figured, "Hell, I've tried everything
Reviews throw a spotlight on work we might ignore, and they can embed that work in a context and tradition we might only dimly be aware of. The problem is that reviews also function as commodities.
I have become an outlier in my own book club. It's an occupational hazard, I suppose, just the lot of the novelist. While the rest of the club read for entertainment and enlightenment, I'm always teasing out plot inconsistencies and dangling modifiers.
What does it mean to have a voice, one that from the first line grabs you and remains with you long after the last one? A strong, unique voice aligned with all the elements of life? Such is the question I have been mulling over of late.
I'm not sure why I love reviews so much and find the reading of criticism so difficult. Maybe it's because reviews are more fun. But it's been helpful to think of criticism not as the enemy of creativity, but as its complement.
There's something rather satisfying about using the Huffington Post, a venue built on blogging, to respond to Peter Stothard's alarmist claim that book bloggers are ruining literature.
The paratextual content in modern Bibles goes far beyond basic features, of course, and there appears to be no limit to the marketing creativity of publishers who continuously repackage the Scriptures.