livable cities

He jumped quickly, with excitement, to a Portland Sustainability Institute (now "Ecodistrict')  graphic (reproduced above
The delegates to the Climate Week arriving in JFK Airport can catch a glimpse of the area in Queens where some of Ramboll's
My conclusions usually stress that authentic "placemaking" with a purpose is often best, how one-time events can help crystallize
The city gate of old in Acaya, Italy: form follows function Today's gateway may even be a first, virtual visit by Google
Moving to Australia has never looked so appealing.
The participation of diverse voices in city decision-making processes is critical to successful urban change. By diverse
More than half of the world's population lives in cities, but in Latin America that figure soars to 80% and in Chile to 90%. This gives immense importance to urban policy making, both to help us understand the present and anticipate the future.
Questions and answers about accessing cities and neighborhoods once spoke the language of exit ramps, street widening and parking adequacy. Now, different conversations, and varied imagery, create diverse story lines, where urban policy and citizen activism converge.
The two photographs below say both simple and remarkable things about how urban residents interact with each other, and the streets around them.
Today's urbanist may also see a future gondola station, a walkable destination, or the potential for sustaining natural pockets amid the built environment.  But what compels such vision? I'll take a leap of faith here, in order to put a modern gloss on the human imagination that conceived the edge of the earth in Italy, long ago.
I saw a ghost, of a missing building from a boyhood memory -- something that Amazon might have retrofitted, today, if it were still there for the taking.
When Charles Montgomery penned The Happy City, he knew that going forward, evolving cities need to honor human emotion. His follow-up labs attempt to measure what humans want and need in urban environments.
During a year filled with four trips abroad and two months away, many of my 2014 Facebook cover photos helped fill my yearly urban and exurban diaries.
We carry with us the ability to mine pride from place, even in places that are, perhaps, least expected to shine.
While Cassis is known as a fishing village turned touristic haven (and a departure point for dramatic rock faces above the Mediterranean and remarkable inlets along coast, a short distance from Marseille), this essay is hardly a travelogue.
I have compiled 25 photographs for this essay -- taken in multiple locations since 2009, including cities on four continents. The photographs are presented in black and white, to better show the contrast between the human and built environment, yet also emphasize the undeniably symmetry between.
The ebb and flow of nature, economic base and the passage of time are always ripe for observation. Below, take note of one walk's illustration of two towns, their edges and the spaces between.
Sensing the city is a personal experience owned by each of us. From a legal perspective, it is an urban property right that transcends public and private domains. It is a form of place-decoding that deserves more illustration and attention.
According to the New York Times' Roger Cohen, France is struggling with changing times, including how perception of classic physical space is evolving as the role of cyberspace expands.