live and invest overseas

Here's a more practical dining-out tip: Never buy bottled water. Ask instead for a "carafe d'eau." Bottled water is expensive
Two decades ago, Panama was homologous enough that my naively generalized recommendation wasn't as misleading as it would be today. In the past 20 years, Panama has developed into very different regions...each of which makes more or less sense for today's retiree looking to reinvent his life overseas.
Today, 18 years and a half-dozen starting-a-business-in-a-foreign-country-from-nothing experiences later, I can explain. Someone who hasn't done it isn't going to understand, but it's just the way it goes.
If you're hesitating making an international move because you have children, you're making a mistake. That, however, is not to say that raising kids in another country is easy.
When I began paying attention to Colombia, in 2008, the country was maligned, misunderstood, and mistrusted for two reasons -- Pablo Escobar and the terrorist group known as FARC.
Six things I wish someone had told me before I bought my first piece of foreign property or opened my first offshore company.
Since the Vietnam War, Canada has been seen as a beacon of refuge among Americans. However, life in Canada comes with a significant drawback: Canadian winters look like blizzard scenes on Star Wars' ice planet Hoth.
Over the past two decades, my husband Lief Simon and I have built a real estate investment portfolio that today includes more than two dozen pieces of property in 13 countries.
In 2008, I took my leave from the publishing company where I'd been working for 23 years. I was 45-years-old and living in Paris. I spent the next three months exploring that city on foot, early to late each day, and got to know Paris well.
Here are 11 things I've learned from the school of hard knocks after three international moves across three continents with two kids, a dog, a turtle, a husband, and two businesses.