living alone

Feeling lonely during the coronavirus pandemic is normal. Therapists share little ways to feel more connected in isolation.
When your living situation becomes a living nightmare.
“It’s healthy to be around others, but it's also healthy to be comfortable enough to spend time by yourself.”
This holiday season I plan to enjoy the small moments a little more, appreciate that my children are with me this year and simply breathe it all in.
Loneliness is an emotion that doesn't always make a lot of sense. Two people may have very similar social lives, and yet one might feel isolated more often than the other -- even when surrounded by people they know and love, who know and love them back.
"Pooping with the door open. You'll never know a truer form of freedom."
The ability to be alone is essential to eventually being in a relationship. It is our self-love that attracts a partner that is right for us. Being alone teaches us to accept ourselves, forgive ourselves, and finally to bloom ourselves open to love again.
When you're married, even if it's a bad marriage, you have someone to attend events with, ask to check out that weird mole on your back and trust to call an ambulance if you keel over in the night. When you live alone and you're getting older, there's no one to notice the little things.
I moved five times during my first two years out of college, and though my apartments were in different cities with different floor plans and wildly varying rents, one of my criteria was non-negotiable: I had to have roommates.
That's when I decided it was time to take charge of this whole living alone thing. I set out to consciously experience what was happening within my own four walls -- and came to some pretty freeing realizations.