living with cancer

For HuffPost Wellness' series 'Living With,' we're giving you a guide to navigating conditions that affect your mind and body.
I can state, unequivocally, that the process of learning these lessons has transformed my own life.
This belief comes from a personal journey and has been validated by thousands of people who have found happiness--and even
"What makes human life meaningful, even in the face of death and decay?"
You keep trying because you don't wish to be dying of cancer. You live with it and you live despite it. Your fight for the soul that must stay not die, bit by bit, inside the body that betrayed you so cruelly. You live as if you are, alive wholly and completely until the day that you truly die.
I'm not one to try to find the silver lining in having breast cancer. Cancer sucks. I'm not one to wax romantic about all the lessons I have learned about life because of cancer. The primary lesson I have learned is that cancer sucks.
Three years is a long time in anyone's life, but in a child's life, it is an eternity. She never attended middle school without feeling like the "cancer kid." At 14 years old, she barely remembers a time in her life before she was sick.
In reality, even with 19 and a half hours, getting anything done on the boat other than eating, drinking, peeing, sleeping, is not easy. Maybe it's the rocking. Maybe it's the birds, the clouds, the soft crests of the sea. Maybe because it is so very easy to sit and look out at the ocean and completely space out.
I am a 42-year-old wife, mother and local church pastor living with breast cancer. Actually, Jesus said it first. And the great Jewish prophets said it many times before him. But Marques Bovre, a Wisconsin-based singer/songwriter/theologian, had this amazing ability to bring Jesus' words to life through music and poetry.
I knew running wasn't going to be possible for a long time after the cancer diagnosis last year. So my last 5k run was May 2014 with both my sons -- two weeks before my double mastectomy was scheduled...
Cancer isn't normally something to be thankful for, but ultimately through the experience I learned some timeless truths. I will not be the last young person to receive a cancer diagnosis, and to those of the future, I offer this.
By Anna Medaris Miller for U.S. News Now add cancer to the mix, and it’s easy to see why quality sleep is fleeting. A cancer
Treating the physical and psychological consequences of cancer may garner the most successful result -- living a quality and healthy life by enjoying family, friends and special milestones.
Quote: "My main problem with Hollywood's depiction of cancer is how they handle the death bed. It's always too neat. The
6. When confronting the unknown or the fear of relapse, live in the present. "To practice meditation, you have to live in
I'll treat my cancer wholeheartedly each time it flares up, and do whatever I can between occurrences to keep the disease at bay for as long as possible. And I'll live my life with joy and gratitude in the meantime. Because peace is less stressful and more sustainable than war, and love is more powerful than hate. Always.
When I heard that my sister, Tracey's breast cancer had returned to us 10 years later as stage Four Metastatic Cancer and was taking a roller coaster ride through her spinal column, the first thing that I did was stop breathing.
We kept up with it and at the end of the year I had this visual story that was told with pictures. My brother wrote the song