local-food-movement

At the same time that we are arguing for healthier meals in school cafeterias, we also have a long-standing tradition of turning our school kids into candy pushers in order to raise funds for their team uniforms or their band trips. But it doesn't have to be lke this.
It was only a matter of time. The viral spread of craft beer has made it to Germany, the country whose beer is so good nobody thought it could get any better.
When I launched the first-ever Real Food Media short films contest, I didn't know what I was getting myself into. I just knew that there were incredible stories of people farming, growing, cooking, sharing food and fighting to fix our broken food system that people weren't hearing.
I am glad, in many ways, that organic items are becoming more affordable. Yet, as recent study participants remind us, while our nation tightens its embrace of organics, we should keep a mindful eye on whose interests really are being served.
Farms selling locally may grow a wider variety of crops, they may pack or process on the farm or use workers to transport and market their products. Regardless, local food has big potential for job creation and economic opportunity.
Since Thanksgiving is upon us, let's unify our voice in telling Butterball --the world's largest producer of turkey -- that we will not support the factory farming of turkeys this year.
The rules and institutions governing our food system -- Wall Street, the U.S. Farm Bill, the World Trade Organization and the USDA -- all favor the global monopolies controlling the world's seeds, food processing, distribution and retail.