locavore

Fine cuisine is alive and well in the school lunchrooms of France. The menu includes lamb tajine, veal, crêpes, organic veggies, pâté and organic bread. Oh, yes -- and a cheese course.
The diet of the modern-day "locavore" isn't a new concept, though the word only recently came about. Before society got carried away with all its glittering supermarkets and high-yielding factory farms, food was produced locally and eaten locally, with a few exceptions.
Fall beer season is just around the corner. And as craft beer rides a seismic wave of popularity that shows no sign of letting up, beer travelers are more sophisticated and beer tours are getting more interesting.
Local food production, especially with fruits and vegetables is growing tremendously. In addition to helping your local economy, you can feel good knowing that your locally sourced foods are providing you and your family with healthful benefits.
Eating gourmet wild food at a picnic table under the trees opened my palate and fed my soul.
It would be difficult to visit an ethnic market in the United States and find ingredients which are sourced nationally, let alone locally.
Virtually everything served at The Willows was to come from the island itself or the surrounding waters.
These newcomers face impossibly-priced agricultural land and extreme weather, but with these challenges also comes something the first generation of back-to-the-landers did not have.
Cultural places in the Berkshires like Tanglewood, Mass MoCA, Jacob's Pillow and the Williamstown Theater Festival have traditionally stolen the headlines as the stars of this picturesque region, but the locavore food and drink movement is shifting the spotlight.