Lockheed Martin

Patrick Shanahan, the Pentagon's acting chief, allegedly touted his former employer while disparaging competitors.
Lockheed Martin and Boeing were two of Gabbard's largest donors during the 2016 election cycle.
The since-deleted tweet came days after reports identified a Lockheed Martin bomb as one used in an attack on a Yemen school bus.
During the mid-1930s, a best-selling exposé of the international arms trade, combined with a U.S. Congressional investigation
Job growth slowed sharply in March amid continued layoffs in the retail sector.
His nominees to run the Army and Navy backed out over ethics regulations. Now, his Air Force choice faces controversy.
by Niv Sultan You couldn’t blame defense contractors for being in a great mood this week. In his speech to Congress on Tuesday
Now that the Red Menace has been taken care of, NATO has struggled over the last twenty-odd years to redefine itself.
Defense companies thrive when global conflicts drive up military expenditures, and Lockheed Martin is no exception. The company has made increasing its exports a top priority.
Rather than treating it as a jobs program, let's make the F-35 program rise or fall on its merits. That would mean holding off on the 450-plane "block buy" contemplated by the Pentagon, and deciding whether it's worth going beyond the 500 planes already committed to, out of a planned total of over 2,400.
By steadily consolidating Ultra Conservative Republican support, Cruz has created an illusion of momentum; but no one knows better than Cruz that he urgently needs to widen his base.
When you spend $400 on a motorcycle helmet, you have certain expectations about quality and safety. But what should you expect when your helmet costs $400,000? Well, if you expected it to be magically able to see through walls, you'd be right. It won't actually give you Superman's X-Ray vision, but it's pretty close.
Readers -- and taxpayers -- should take these corporate connections into account when assessing the objectivity of pro-bomber pieces like the Mitchell Institute report. Of course, even interested parties can be right some of the time. But that is not the case with respect to the new bomber.