looking for work after 50

Do you believe a December job search is basically a waste of your time and energy? If so, think again ... the holidays are actually one of the best times of year to look for work!
Advice from "Fifty-Five, Unemployed and Faking Normal."
Has your job search stalled? Are you feeling isolated and discouraged? Do you believe your age alone has led to major setbacks and missed opportunities? If you answered, 'yes' to any of these questions, you just might find yourself pleasantly surprised.
Are you an older job-seeker who is currently looking for work? If so, you have likely faced your share of roadblocks and unfortunate stereotypes based upon your age alone.
As a mature job-seeker, you already know this cardinal rule: If you want the job, you have to ace the interview.
What are the real reasons that make employers find a candidate attractive? Are applicants appealing because of the skills they bring to the position? Are they especially desirable as a result of the companies where they've worked, their educational background or the status of their job title?
Mature job-seekers face special challenges. It is common knowledge that younger employers are likely to hold several negative stereotypes relating to age. Perhaps the most prevalent of these is that you lack the necessary technical skills for the job. There is one surefire way to counteract this presumption.
Think summer jobs are just for kids? Well ... think again! Now is just the right time and you are at just the right age to land an adventure-filled position that will prove both fun and rewarding. The seasonal job market has opened up to applicants of all ages.
This is the time of year for making New Year's resolutions. And if you are a savvy job-seeker, it's also time to take full advantage of the surge in hiring that takes place in January and February.
Conducting a proactive job search is, by far, the most effective way to land your next position. Rather than merely reacting to the market by responding to postings, answering ads or attending job fairs, proactive job-seekers target companies where they'd like to work and network their way through the door.
Most savvy job-seekers would reply to the negative. They are well aware that networking is the most effective method to finding work. In fact, job search articles claim that anywhere from 75 to 90 percent of positions are obtained through personal referral. And this percentage grows even greater for the older applicant.
As companies focused more on the bottom line, they began to refer to workers as "assets" and when times got tough, they looked at which "assets" to cut. "Do more with less," "Get rid of the fat," and "leaner and meaner" were the propaganda slogans that sent chills down workers' spines. Older workers quickly read the writing on the wall.
How would you like to be viewed as the #1 Candidate for the job? Think it's impossible once you've hit fifty or older? Think again!
You have been called in for a job interview... You've studied the position description and have created several examples highlighting ways you've made a positive impact using the skills required in the posting. You've also prepared focused responses that feature your knowledge of the company. Yet there are three basic interview questions that can really trip you up.
Savvy job-seekers know that there are several ways to prepare for the job interview. Applicants must thoroughly research the company, understand the competition, and be knowledgeable as to the current conditions of the industry/field.
Take pride in your skills, your unique personal strengths and qualities and your value as a potential employee.
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Interviewing for a job can be difficult enough, but now technology has created a big, new, virtual wrinkle. More and more interviews are being conducted via the Internet by way of your webcam and they are growing in popularity because they save employers both time and money.
If you think that you're no longer valued in the work world, it's an awfully big challenge to present yourself as a confident, can-do candidate.