lord of the flies

The actor's blistering take on the death of democracy accompanied his latest anti-Trump cartoon.
"An all female reboot of Lord of the Flies is just Heathers Goes Camping."
I keep wondering, in what seems the new, emperor’s-new-clothes-like surreality: where have all the grown-ups gone? Where
Just as Lord of the Flies is not about Jack, this year's campaign is not about Donald Trump. The grown-up Republican primary voters who have made Trump their presumptive nominee, have yielded to the same primitive temptations as the boys of the book.
In 1954, a single book destroyed the popular notion that children are innocent souls. In that book, a plane of such innocent
What kind of an unprincipled political party attempts to nullify an entire branch of government? For that matter, what kind of political party wants fewer people to vote?
There was once a man who lived in Dadri, an Indian town in Northwest Uttar Pradesh. Most people in Dadri are Hindu, but Mohammad Akhlaq was Muslim. One night, after he had gone to bed, one hundred men stormed his house, dragged him into the street, and stoned him to death.
The GOP worked so hard for so long to attain the power they have amassed: control over the United States Congress, one of the most powerful bodies in the entire world. And what they do with that power? They use toddler-inspired "my way or the highway" strategies to win, and most striking, they readily destroy their own if they can't get their way.
It's no surprise that we're halfway through our run, so there's also a panic that sets in, the feeling that there's a bunch of things you're missing forever, because you can't possibly see everything you want to see.
In all my theater-going days, I don't remember seeing a production that would likely give me nightmares. The thought had never crossed my mind. Until, that is, I went to the Pleasance Company and witnessed The Curing Room, David Ian Lee's import from the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.
Being a professional nanny is a kind of ridiculous satire for a girl raised by a single dad.
On this week's episode of Thug Notes, Sparky Sweets, PhD discusses J.D. Salinger's The Catcher In The Rye, analyzing the
Sparky Sweets, PhD, has another round of "Thug Notes," his answer to SparkNotes. This time, he analyzes William Golding's
"There's something about song structure, the narrowness of the form that makes it both doable and damnable. You can finish it in a short time and that's the blessing that curses; it's hard to fit in those lines, to get them just right."