Lorraine Hansberry

Fifty years after its Broadway debut, the play remains as vital as it was in 1970.
“Eventually it comes to you: the thing that makes you exceptional, if you are at all, is inevitably that which must also
Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun," directed by Phyllis B. Gitlin for the Long Beach Playhouse's Mainstage Theatre, presents a compelling look at the choices an African-American family face at the dawn of the Civil Rights era.
First, let me begin by saying that the last thing that I have time for is to write about and analyze a Beyonce piece, as I am in the middle of finishing a book about health disparities and social injustice, which are issues that are deeply plaguing our community.
I often travel through the Chicago O'Hare airport which triggered thoughts about women from Illinois and their contributions through history.
While playwrights such as Lynn Nottage (51), Suzan Lori-Parks (52), George C. Wolfe (60), and Ntozake Shange (66) are familiar names on the theatrical landscape, a younger generation of gifted African-American dramatists such as Katori Hall (34) and Marcus Gardley (37) have been impressing audiences with their work.
The majority population, most of whom pollsters tell us did not believe Officer Wilson committed any crimes, may believe the country can afford to accept things as they are. People of color -- Black men and their families and those who depend on them cannot afford that luxury. They need us to get this right.
While each of these dramas deals with weighty issues, it's no surprise to hear the audience frequently laughing during the performance. Is it because one man's tragedy is another man's comedy? Or because human beings, in their most fallible moments, are a constant source of wonder and entertainment?
Sexuality need not be the focus of the stories written about either Chirlane McCray or Lorraine Hansberry; their accomplishments took place outside of their bedrooms. But sexuality is part of who they are -- who we all are -- it's an important part of the story, and it matters how that story is told.
I’m not sure what kind of day Lorraine Hansberry was having on April 1, 1960, but whatever was going on led her to come up