Los Alamos

By Gary Grider Tucked in the foothills of the Jemez mountains in northern New Mexico, among the ponderosa pines and endless
Earthquakes pose a vital yet puzzling set of research questions that have confounded scientists for decades, but new ways of looking at seismic information and innovative laboratory experiments are offering tantalizing clues to what triggers earthquakes -- and when.
Redmayne as Hawking. Cumberbatch as Turing. If the timing were right, Christopher Lee would have been superb in the big-screen story of British-born theoretical physicist Geoffrey West. (I've interviewed both.)
As a response to the recent campaign by veterans called Veterans Against the Deal to lobby against the proposed anti-nuclear proliferation, former Peace Corps members who served in Iran are countering with their own Volunteers For the Deal for a variety of reasons.
Speaking on behalf of indigenous people in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, earlier this summer, Pope Francis apologized for the role the Catholic Church played in oppressing Latin America's indigenous people.
It was seventy years ago that human beings were first targeted with -- and annihilated by -- an atomic bomb.
I've been on Bob's trail. I've motored to Los Alamos countless times praying that I would arrive in time to get the last croissant. The ones with almond paste are the most sinful.
The U.S. did not apply the knee-jerk capitalistic model of mobilizing competition. Had we succumbed to that model, the government might have offered grants and other incentives to encourage individual scientists, universities, private and publicly held companies to compete in a race to develop the bomb -- with benefits to the winner.
A wave of new books and shows has washed into the summer of 2014, all built around the theme of the greatest secret of World War II: the making of the atomic bomb.
The 55-year-old political scientist asked the reason for the request, and he eventually was told that someone at the House