Lou Gehrig

Jeter’s speech will not likely inspire great cinema. But Gehrig’s did.
Although this would be the last major league contingent to go out to Japan before the war, teams from Harvard and Yale toured
A few years ago on Yogi Berra's birthday, I tweeted out a birthday greeting with a link to a YouTube video of his career
Joe Engel was involved with professional baseball from age 19 through his mid-60s. He spent most of his career associated with Clark Griffith, owner of the Washington Senators. Engel pitched for the Senators from 1912-1915 as well as his final year in the Majors, 1920.
In spite of a horrendous childhood, Lear developed the necessary elements for success. Yes, he's a talented writer, producer and executive. He is also a master salesman. As a mid-level development executive in his Embassy Productions, I witnessed the executive Lear in action.
More than any other couple we've ever interviewed, Ron and Mariah embody the principle that when two hearts are separated, all difficulties can seem insurmountable, but when they are united as one, nothing is impossible.
The overstatement of Jeter's intangible contributions, efforts to make him into a paragon of integrity and honor when he is essentially a great ballplayer who managed to stay out of trouble and not say anything stupid to the media in 20 years, all make it increasingly difficult to either like Jeter or take his farewell tour seriously.
BOSTON (AP) — A 27-year-old man died in a Nantucket diving accident, hours after he raised $100,000 for a Lou Gehrig's disease
On July 4, 1939 a frail Henry Louis Gehrig stepped in front of a packed crowd at Yankee Stadium. The Manhattan-native knew he was sick, but he was unaware that his illness (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS) would soon claim his life.
Gehrig was not only a great baseball player, he was a great man. Not only did he set a standard that all baseball players can aspire to, as Landis pointed out, he also set a standard that all human beings can aim for, whatever role they play in life.
Every mention of a core four, the alleged true Yankees at the heart of their 1996-2009 run, is a reminder of how another great Yankee, Bernie Williams, has become increasingly overlooked over time.
No club can claim a more fabled history; and within an American context this matters greatly. The United States is a youngish
Eric Simonson, who gets his kicks writing plays about sports figures, is jumping the gun on Valentine's Day by sending a lavish Broadway card to now 88-year-old Yogi Berra.
With his 24th career grand slam, the New York Yankees' PED pariah broke the MLB record for career bases-loaded homers previously
Dear Mr. Rodriquez, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge your recent comments about "fighting for your life." I would like you to understand what that profound, emotional claim truly means.
It's a point of pride that no other city has so many good movies set in it as New York. Even a cursory Google search yields literally hundreds of titles shot here.
This foursome was the more or less regular Yankee infield from 2009-2012, leading the Yankees to one World Series victory and three other post-season appearances. This raises the question of where this infield fits among the greatest infields in Yankee history.
Muscles weaken. Walking becomes impossible. Then swallowing becomes a challenge. Then breathing. In the end, the patient finds herself trapped in a non-functioning body, waiting to die.
The Yankees are in sufficiently bad shape that even a great year by Rivera will not bring them back to the World Series. Moreover, Rivera is not the only aging Yankee seeking to recover from an injury.
It's the breakfast of champions, or the champion of breakfasts: Ever since we can remember, Wheaties cereal boxes have been