Low Sodium Diets

Read the nutritional information carefully — even if you think you know which item is healthier, it might surprise you.
We all know the impact eating well has on our bodies, but what about our minds?
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Take it easy on the salt! That's what we've all been told by our doctors time and time again. It's an age-old adage that represents good heart health, especially for older Americans that suffer from cardiovascular diseases.
I do take comfort in the knowledge that low sodium life is better for us. Experts agree that we should eat no more than 1,500
March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation encourages people to learn about the kidneys and kidney-related conditions, including kidney stones.
Everyone can benefit from reducing sodium because a positive side effect of doing so is increasing the amount of fresh, whole foods you get in your diet.
Beware the Salt Traps We all know we shouldn’t eat too much salt -- that overdoing it can lead to high blood pressure, heart
People remembered that salt is just a single "spice" on the rack -- that, actually, there are a lot of other ways to flavor foods. And when you remove the salt, it makes room for exciting new flavor combinations and creative versions of classic recipes.
I refused to eat bland food or feel like a second-class culinary citizen because of my diet. And in a world where salt sits on a flavor pedestal, I decided that it was time to rewrite the low-sodium rules (uninspiring) and prove that salt-free dishes could keep up (exciting).
Most people assume that a guest-worthy Thanksgiving turkey relies on soaking it first in a salty brine or a salty rub. But here's a little secret: That's not true. There are actually many different ways to cook a tasty turkey, beyond the brine, that will leave the skin golden and the meat moist.
There's a big story unfolding behind the scenes, with a McDonald's tie-in, that will undoubtedly have an unprecedented impact on the eating choices and habits of Americans.