Lucretia Mott

It is women’s history month and what better way to honor the past by naming the future? The following 15 female names reflect
As a member of the Advisory Committee for Women on 20s, I was delighted to hear the announcement that Harriet Tubman will be the face of the $20 bill.
Kudos to the Treasury Department which has announced that Harriet Tubman's face will grace the front of the redesigned $20 bill, making her the first woman in more than a century and first African American ever to be represented on the face of an American paper note.
Journalist and author Cokie Roberts says that philandering liar Alexander Hamilton is still making women wait their turn to assume their rightful place on the front of American currency.
Harriet Tubman was selected earlier this year through a nationwide vote to be on the new $20 bill. As we continue to discuss women on the money, let's discover some of the many accomplished women through history.
One hundred and sixty-seven years ago, on July 19-20, 1848, over three hundred men and women gathered at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York for the first Women's Rights Convention. There in a small industrial town on a branch of the Erie Canal in upstate New York, began a fight that would last for 72 years.
Notable reformers were present, such as Frederick Douglas. It launched the national career of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. And it set into motion events and relationships that would forever change American society. Here are five things you may not know about the convention.
With words that at the time were probably regarded as heresy "that all men and women are created equal," the document also listed 18 grievances, including the lack of the right to vote. The battle -- which would take 72 years -- had begun.
Marisol dug beneath the surface to engage with ideas that were political. Ignoring the vagaries of the art scene, Marisol explored her own vision and imagery undeterred by the knowledge that her direction was not always in tune with the prevailing sensibilities.
Many historical women whose accomplishments we are aware of today had to battle society's perceptions of women's proper place. Some women were fortunate enough to have the support of a man in their endeavors -- the "He for She" paradigm Emma Watson recently spoke of at the U.N.
Women's Equality Day quietly came and went recently, not quite 100 years after passage of the Nineteenth Amendment -- the law that said women were equally entitled, along with men, to the right to vote.
Here are a few groundbreaking women who blazed the trail for women in the 21st century. We thank them for blazing the trail for us.
and women are created equal." One-hundred sixty-five years ago this week on July 19-20 1848, 300 women and men met in Seneca
We all owe a huge debt of gratitude to the legions of women who led the fight, many of whom were considered extreme radicals at the time. Most suffragists first fought on behalf of other causes.
In evoking the battles at Seneca Falls, Selma and Stonewall -- and in selecting Evers, Blanco, and Rev. Leon to participate in the ceremony -- Obama was reminding Americans that the progress toward a better society is made primarily by people working together through social movements.
Suddenly I heard it: the Quaker in Oprah. The emphasis on a light inside each of us is the central Quaker concept of the way God works. Oprah's theology in a kind of a mass media sermon seemed to be a fresh way of putting those things.
In this era, we can no longer afford for deliberation, defined as "leisureliness of movement or action; slowness" to define us as women.
This is a diverse country, and getting elected in some states is much harder than in others, but the message has to continue to be the same -- women can and must make a difference.
On this date in 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified by the necessary two-thirds of the states and women were granted the right to vote. Somewhere Abigail Adams was smiling.